Pensacola is home to a small (0.2% of city residents)[46] but significant Jewish community, whose roots date mostly to German Jewish immigrants of the mid-to-late 19th century. There were also Sephardic Jewish migrants from other areas of the South, and immigrants from other areas of Europe. The first Florida chapter of B'nai Brith was founded downtown in 1874, as well as the first temple, Beth-El, in 1876. Apart from the Reform Beth-El, Pensacola is also served by the Conservative B'nai Israel Synagogue.[47] Paula Ackerman, the first woman who performed rabbinical functions in the United States, was a Pensacola native and led services at Beth-El.

There were 24,524 households out of which 24.6% had children living with them, 39.7% were married couples living together, 16.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.2% were non-families. 32.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.27 and the average family size was 2.92.

The median income for a household in the city was $34,779, and the median income for a family was $42,868. Males had a median income of $32,258 versus $23,582 for females. The per capita income for the city was $30,556 in 2011. About 12.7% of families and 16.3%[48] of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.2% of those under age 18 and 9.2% of those age 65 or over.
The Deepwater Horizon, a BP-operated oil-drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico off the Louisiana coast, exploded April 20, 2010, eventually releasing almost 5 million barrels of oil into the Gulf before being capped on August 4, 2010. Oil from the explosion did not reach Pensacola Beaches until June 4, 2010. Crews posted along Escambia County’s coastline quickly cleaned much of the oil that was evident along the beaches. Tourism in the Pensacola Beach area was adversely affected during the summer of 2010.
For more than 30 years the Pensacola Beach Chamber of Commerce has been a leading voice for business on Santa Rosa Island.  Our membership of 200+ businesses is diverse and representative of our community.   Governed by a Board of Directors of local business leaders, we represent a variety of industries, business size and geographic locations, not restricted to beach-bound locations.  Advocacy is the cornerstone of our Chamber and is why we are growing in our role of influence. The Pensacola Beach Chamber of Commerce is a strong proponent of local economic growth and serves as a platform through which our members and the community can thrive. The PBCC is a voluntary partnership of business and professional people, working in unison to create a healthy economy and improve the quality of life for individuals on Pensacola Beach. The Chamber exists to strengthen, enhance and encourage the prosperity of existing business and the development of new ones.  As your Chamber strives to accomplish these goals, it plays many roles: economic developer, tourist information center, business spokesperson, economic counselor and public relations practitioner. HOW CAN WE HELP YOU THRIVE THIS YEAR?
The beach is stunning, and very relaxing on off-season. If you are up for visiting Pensacola, and are not wanting seafood every day for every meal, check out the Tin Cow in historic downtown Pensacola. It’s an awesome build your own burger place with amazing toppings and sauces, and they serve THE BEST spiked milkshakes! Perfect for trying the famous Bushwakers that Pensacola is known for!
What does your dream beach vacation look like? Relaxing, low-key getaway in a quaint beach bungalow? Sport fishing, parasailing and scuba diving adventure? Luxurious spa treatments, fine dining and shopping? Nature trails, dolphins and shorebirds? Historic downtown, museums and antiquing? Whatever you’re into, the Pensacola Bay Area has just what you’re looking for when it comes to the perfect place to vacation! 
Pensacola Beach for many years remained largely undeveloped. The Casino Resort was the first tourist destination constructed on the island (at the present day location of Casino Beach) where a variety of special events including beauty pageants, fishing tournaments and boxing matches were held from the 30s through 50s. With a bar, tennis courts, bath houses, and a restaurant, it was a popular resort until it eventually closed in the 1960s.
Tourist attractions: Dial-A-Story (Cultural Attractions- Events- & Facilities; 200 West Gregory Street) (1), Advanced Amusement of Northwest Florida (Amusement & Theme Parks; 6215 North 9th Avenue) (2), Fast Eddies Fun Center (505 West Michigan Avenue) (3), 101 Things To DO (315 South Palafox Street) (4), Dinosaur Adventure Land (5800 North Palafox Street) (5), First City Fun Center (65 East Olive Road) (6), Dreamland Skating Center Inc - Main OFC (2607 East Olive Road) (7), Balloon Port of Pensacola (6548 Mobile Highway) (8). Display/hide their approximate locations on the map
British military resources were limited and Pensacola ranked fairly low on their list of priorities. For this reason only small token amounts of British military forces were ever sent to defend Pensacola. This was in contrast to colonies such as South Carolina, where large numbers of British soldiers were sent.[26] After Spain joined the American Revolution in 1779 on the side of the rebels, Spanish forces captured the city in the 1781 Battle of Pensacola, gaining control of West Florida.[19] After the war, the British officially ceded both West Florida and East Florida to Spain as part of the post-war peace settlement.
In the midst of downtown’s busy Palafox Street is the 9Blue Morning Gallery 9Blue Morning Gallery Google Map: 21 S. Palafox St. Website: http://bluemorninggallery.com/ 850-429-9100 artist’s cooperative, begun in 1997. It’s so full of artwork that when I first stepped in all I saw was a blur of colors; gradually my eyes adjusted to the large array of jewelry, paintings, blown glass, photography and ceramics on display, created by its more than 60 members. Pensacola offers endless inspiration, jeweler Diane Rennie tells me. “We are this little area of art,” she says. She’s a former president of the cooperative and a longtime member. “It’s such an inspiring environment to be in, and there’s a large retirement community here. People find fun things to do, and one of those things is making art.” David Williams is one of them. A jeweler who specializes in opals, he moved to Pensacola in 2010 after living in Georgia and western North Carolina, and says he’s found his forever home. He lives in a 1920s house near Bayou Texar and kayaks in the bay: “I see dolphins every morning.” 
Pensacola Beach is zoned (assigned to) a different ECSD elementary school, Suter Elementary School,[17] as well as Workman Middle School,[18] and Pensacola High School.[19] However most students in Pensacola Beach attend Santa Rosa County School District schools in Gulf Breeze for middle and high school grades:[15] they would include Gulf Breeze Middle School and Gulf Breeze High School. In addition, some attend Pensacola-area magnet schools.[20]

Categories: 1698 establishments in the Spanish EmpireCounty seats in FloridaPopulated places on the Intracoastal Waterway in FloridaCities in Escambia County, FloridaPensacola, FloridaFormer colonial and territorial capitals in the United StatesPort cities and towns of the Florida Gulf coastPopulated places established in 1559Cities in FloridaCities in Pensacola metropolitan areaUniversity towns in the United States


“You turn the lights on, and they come every which way, like roaches,” says Renee Mack, speaking with crusty affection of her customers at 6Paradise Bar & Grill 6Paradise Bar and Grill Google Map: 21 Via De Luna Website: http://www.paradisebar-grill.com/ 850-916-5087 . “They come by boat, by foot, by golf cart, by Jet Ski.” Paradise is an authentic little hideaway on the bay side of Pensacola Beach, a restaurant, bar and vintage motel. You can swim up if you like. Bring a wet dog. Hang up your own hammock or lounge at one of the picnic tables under an umbrella. Paradise has an old-Florida feel. There’s no view of the high-rises, just a good look at that gentle bay surf. Evenings, locals gather to hear a live band and dance in the sand of the private beach. Mack moved to Pensacola in 1984 from New Orleans and brought some Big Easy traditions with her, such as a penchant for the blues and oyster po’ boys, featured on the menu. Her biggest seller is Renee’s Shrimp Salad, from her grandmother’s recipe, made with fresh, wild-caught Gulf shrimp. It’s kicky Cajun flavor comes from fresh herbs. The special sauce in her bushwackers? “We put in a lot of liquor — a lot of rum. And real soft-serve ice cream — none of that powdered stuff.” Mack, as you might gather, likes to keep things simple. Bad weather gets a shrug. “We roll,” she says. “We don’t close down.”
Public primary and secondary education schools in Pensacola are administered by the Escambia County School District. The current superintendent of schools for Escambia County is Malcolm Thomas. The University of West Florida, located north of the city, is the largest post-secondary institution in the area. It also has the largest library in the region, the John C. Pace Library.
Most residents choose to navigate the metro area by car. A number of major thoroughfares traverse the region: Interstate 110 runs north to south, connecting central Pensacola with Interstate 10, which moves east to west across Florida. Meanwhile, Routes 29, 90 and 98 link the downtown area with nearby communities like Ensley, Myrtle Grove and Bellview. Those who don't have a car can rely on the Escambia County Area Transit, or ECAT, system, which operates bus and trolley routes throughout the greater Pensacola area. However, access to the transit system becomes less extensive the farther you are from central Pensacola.
*Savings based on all vacation package bookings with Flight + Hotel on Expedia.com from January through December 2017, as compared to price of the same components booked separately. Savings will vary based on origin/destination, length of trip, stay dates and selected travel supplier(s). Savings not available on all packages. For Free Flight or 100% Off Flight deals, package savings is greater than or equal to the current cost of one component, when both are priced separately.
Notable locations in Pensacola: Belvedere Park Plaza (A), Town 'N Country Plaza (B), Muscogee Wharf (C), Pensacola Port Authority (D), Dr Vernon McDaniel Administration Building (E), Select Specialty Hospital (F), Lifeguard Air Ambulance (G), Pensacola Fire Department Station 7 (H), Pensacola Fire Department Station 2 (I), Pensacola Fire Department Station 6 (J), Pensacola Fire Department Station 3 (K), Pensacola Fire Department Station 4 (L), Pensacola Fire Department Station 1 (M). Display/hide their locations on the map

Pensacola loves its Blue Angels; you’ll find pictures of the blue-and-gold aircraft painted on local bridges. Head west of the city to visit their home base, Naval Air Station Pensacola, where practices start up again in March. The base also hosts the 4National Naval Aviation Museum, 4National Naval Aviation Museum Google Map: 1750 Radford Blvd., Naval Air Station Pensacola Website: http://www.navalaviationmuseum.org/ 850-452-3604 or 850-452-3606 open year-round. It’s the world’s largest, and you can easily spend half a day or more among its minutely detailed aircraft carrier models and restored aircraft, including the World War II Corsair, nicknamed “Whistling Death,” with its unique inverted gull wing, and the Que Sera Sera, the first aircraft to land at the South Pole. “Home Front U.S.A.,” an exhibit of small-town life in 1943, re-creates a street lined with wartime grocery and barber shops, full of vintage treasures. At the museum’s heart is a 10,000-square-foot atrium, where four historic Blue Angels aircraft hang overhead in perfect formation. Admission is free. 


The region's warm climate and desirable setting isn't the only reason people choose to live in Pensacola. The military has a relatively small, though very significant, presence here. The Naval Air Station Pensacola was the first of its kind commissioned by the U.S. Navy, and its job prospects draw military families. Residents also find employment in the health care, manufacturing and, of course, tourism sectors.
Pensacola Beach is an unincorporated community located on Santa Rosa Island, a barrier island, in Escambia County, Florida, United States. It is situated south of Pensacola (and Gulf Breeze connected via bridges spanning to the Fairpoint Peninsula and then to the island) in the Gulf of Mexico. As of the 2000 census, the community had a total population of 2,738. Pensacola Beach occupies land bound by a 1947 deed from the United States Department of Interior that it be administered in the public interest by the county or leased, but never "disposed"; its businesses and residents are thus long-term leaseholders and not property owners.[1]

Hilton Pensacola Beach – Contemporary, upscale, and luxurious, the Hilton Pensacola Beach offers every amenity you may need to create a memorable Gulf Coast experience. Start the day off with a cup of coffee from your private gulf-front balcony, then stroll along the shoreline before spending some time with a novel on a pool-side lounge chair. Enjoy an adventurous meal at the Bonsai Sushi Bar, then hit the town for an evening in one of the U.S.’s top-5 beach cities.
Pensacola is a great place to live if you love the outdoors. The metro area has many public parks, as well as access to brackish bays and expansive beaches along the Gulf of Mexico – the Gulf Islands National Seashore is especially beautiful. Angling is a popular pastime, and multiple boat ramps provide launching points for deep-sea fishing excursions. Meanwhile, there are plenty of opportunities to enjoy Pensacola's natural surroundings. Project GreenShores – a living shoreline – is an excellent example of ecological restoration and hosts a myriad bird species.
Larry Cowan likes to quote an old Southern saying, used to calm people down: “Don’t worry, it’s going to come together like goat lips.” He says it so often that when he opened his deli turned beer garden, friends dared him to call it Goat Lips. He did. He regretted it at first: “It’s just not appetizing. But it’s turned out to be an asset. It’s memorable.” Thus was 5Goat Lips Chew & Brewhouse 5Goat Lips Chew and Brewhouse Google Map: 2811 Copter Rd. Website: http://www.goatlips.com/ 850-474-1919 born. It houses a small “nanobrewery,” which turns out a half-dozen or so beers on tap. The most unusual — and my favorite — is the jalapeño cream ale. Most breweries don’t offer food, but Goat Lips has a full menu, featuring giant muffuletta sandwiches — a half fills a plate and rises, oh, four to six inches on a base of Gambino’s bread delivered from New Orleans, with layers of mortadella, salami, provolone cheese and olive relish. Then it’s baked, so the edges of the meat get crispy. The shrimp Creole is peppery and rich; the menu also features comfort-food staples, meatloaf, pot roast. Goat Lips has a mellow, casual vibe. Cowan likes bonfires and makes them big enough to withstand even a light rain. The covered back deck is a popular spot for live bands and a weekly Trivia Night — which my husband and I stumbled upon and were immediately swept up in. Out back there’s a statue of a goat carved out of cypress wood, elevated on a little platform. Says Cowan with a laugh, “I’m afraid it’s going to be my tombstone one day.”

Keep in mind that although the entire island's beaches are known as Pensacola Beach, there are also names for the smaller strips of sand therein. For instance, Quietwater Beach is located on the sound side, stretching from the Portofino Boardwalk to the Pensacola Beach bridge tollbooth, and it's very family-friendly with its lifeguard protection and its "quiet waters." Casino Beach is located on the Gulf and has a host of amenities, including restrooms, changing rooms, lifeguards, a fishing pier and more. You'll find this beach just south of the intersection of Via de Luna and Fort Pickens Road. 
While generally cooler than most of peninsular Florida, Pensacola Beach maintains a more stable temperature year round than inland areas of Pensacola and Escambia County. As such, winter lows are several degrees warmer than Pensacola proper and summer highs are generally cooler as a result of the surrounding waters. As with many islands, Pensacola Beach enjoys sea breezes which begin around noon and end around sunset in the summer. The average temperature ranges from forty-eight degrees Fahrenheit in January to eighty-nine degrees in July.[5]
The National Naval Aviation Museum, one of the largest aviation museums in the world, has approximately 150 aircraft on display aboard Naval Air Station Pensacola. NAS Pensacola is also the home of the U.S. Navy’s flight demonstration squadron, and visitors are welcome to watch the team’s aerial acrobatics at practice air shows on select dates March through November.

Pensacola (/ˌpɛnsəˈkoʊlə/) is the westernmost city in the Florida Panhandle, approximately 13 miles (21 km) from the border with Alabama, and the county seat of Escambia County, in the U.S. state of Florida.[9] As of the 2010 census, the city had a total population of 51,923,[10] down from 56,255 at the 2000 census. Pensacola is the principal city of the Pensacola metropolitan area, which had an estimated 461,227 residents in 2012.[11]

×