As was the case in most of Florida, the Democratic primary was the real contest for most state and local elections until the 1970s. However, from the 1960s onward, due in part to the Republican Party's Southern strategy, residents of this staunchly conservative military and Bible Belt city began splitting their tickets and voting Republican in national elections. Despite this, Democrats continued to win most elections at the state and local level well into the 1990s, though most of them were very conservative even by Southern Democratic standards.

One of the oldest metro areas in Florida, Pensacola is full of ways to experience its local history, from exploring the area's historic districts to touring sites like the National Naval Aviation Museum; the historic T.T. Wentworth, Jr. Museum; and the Pensacola Lighthouse and Museum. Another must-see is Fort Pickens. Located on the Gulf Islands National Seashore, it was one of only four Southern forts that Confederate forces were never able to occupy during the Civil War.
Located 40 miles from Pensacola, Shalimar is much loved by tourists. Head to this place to access the Eglin Air Force Base and Gulfarium Marine Adventure Park, two outstanding attractions you won't quickly forget. Just 45 miles away is another neighboring destination that's well worth visiting. Destin is a handy place to access amazing attractions like Destin Commons and Big Kahuna's Water and Adventure Park.

The beach is stunning, and very relaxing on off-season. If you are up for visiting Pensacola, and are not wanting seafood every day for every meal, check out the Tin Cow in historic downtown Pensacola. It’s an awesome build your own burger place with amazing toppings and sauces, and they serve THE BEST spiked milkshakes! Perfect for trying the famous Bushwakers that Pensacola is known for!

Larry Cowan likes to quote an old Southern saying, used to calm people down: “Don’t worry, it’s going to come together like goat lips.” He says it so often that when he opened his deli turned beer garden, friends dared him to call it Goat Lips. He did. He regretted it at first: “It’s just not appetizing. But it’s turned out to be an asset. It’s memorable.” Thus was 5Goat Lips Chew & Brewhouse 5Goat Lips Chew and Brewhouse Google Map: 2811 Copter Rd. Website: http://www.goatlips.com/ 850-474-1919 born. It houses a small “nanobrewery,” which turns out a half-dozen or so beers on tap. The most unusual — and my favorite — is the jalapeño cream ale. Most breweries don’t offer food, but Goat Lips has a full menu, featuring giant muffuletta sandwiches — a half fills a plate and rises, oh, four to six inches on a base of Gambino’s bread delivered from New Orleans, with layers of mortadella, salami, provolone cheese and olive relish. Then it’s baked, so the edges of the meat get crispy. The shrimp Creole is peppery and rich; the menu also features comfort-food staples, meatloaf, pot roast. Goat Lips has a mellow, casual vibe. Cowan likes bonfires and makes them big enough to withstand even a light rain. The covered back deck is a popular spot for live bands and a weekly Trivia Night — which my husband and I stumbled upon and were immediately swept up in. Out back there’s a statue of a goat carved out of cypress wood, elevated on a little platform. Says Cowan with a laugh, “I’m afraid it’s going to be my tombstone one day.”
Located in Pensacola Beach, this nonsmoking beachfront hotel is 5 minutes' walk to the Pensacola Beach Gulf Pier. It features an outdoor pool, on-site fitness center, and an in-room flat-screen TV. The night staff who received us was so helpfull! Our Booking reservation had not arrived and he went out of his way to solve the problem! The sea view was a plus. Breakfast was great
The area was originally inhabited by Muskogean language peoples. The Pensacola people lived there at the time of European contact, and Creek people frequently visited and traded from present-day southern Alabama. Spanish explorer Tristán de Luna founded a short-lived settlement in 1559.[12] In 1698 the Spanish established a presidio in the area, from which the modern city gradually developed. The area changed hands several times as European powers competed in North America. During Florida's British rule (1763–1781), fortifications were strengthened.
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