The National Naval Aviation Museum, one of the largest aviation museums in the world, has approximately 150 aircraft on display aboard Naval Air Station Pensacola. NAS Pensacola is also the home of the U.S. Navy’s flight demonstration squadron, and visitors are welcome to watch the team’s aerial acrobatics at practice air shows on select dates March through November.
“Protect our coast” proclaim the bumper stickers on the cars in the parking lot of 11Ever’man Cooperative Grocery & Cafe 11Ever'man Cooperative Grocery and Cafe Google Map: 315 W. Garden St. Website: https://www.everman.org/ 850-438-0402 , which has carried environmentally sound products and catered to healthy lifestyles since 1973. All of its items adhere to a strict green policy: no MSG, hormones, GMO ingredients, etc. You can grab local organic produce, sandwiches and other fixings for a picnic on the beach, and if you’ve stayed there too long, come back for a chickweed or comfrey salve from Coyote Moon Herb Company to soothe your sunburn. Year-round flowers make honey a popular local product; tupelo flowers grow wild in the Florida Panhandle, and they contribute to a delicate honey that never crystallizes. The coop moved into its current expansive location on West Garden Street in 2014; next door is its education center that offers drop-in classes in cooking and meditation, as well as many tailored to the military community, such as yoga for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder.
“Life’s a Beach” all right on Pensacola Beach where building sandcastles, body surfing and beachcombing are popular pastimes. Away from the sands, there are several don’t miss sights for the entire family, including the National Aviation Museum, which features 150 vintage aircraft, flight simulators and an IMAX Theatre, Fort Pickens, an historic military fort built in 1829, and the Pensacola Lighthouse, the oldest lighthouse on the Gulf Coast and also the tallest, standing 151 feet tall on a 40 foot bluff. To immerse yourself in the history of Pensacola, stroll the historic village, a pedestrian-friendly area with furnished historic homes, unique museums and the Colonial Archeological Trail. For the white dimpled ball set, try teeing up at Lost Key Golf Club, a target golf set up designed by Arnold Palmer and Marcus Pointe Golf club, an Earl Stone design. Don’t forget, there’s also great deep-sea fishing and other water activities like sailing, kayaking, diving and snorkeling to be actively pursued on Pensacola Beach.
Explore the famous Lighthouse and Museum of Pensacola, and experience vistas of Pensacola Beach unparalleled and unrivalled by any other vantage point. Climb the 177 steps to the top of the lighthouse and check out the impressive view of the Pensacola Pass (the point where Pensacola meets the Gulf of Mexico). Built in 1859, the lighthouse has been part of the Pensacola skyline for hundreds of years.
Seafood restaurants crowd the waterfront, but the bustling Joe Patti’s Seafood market stands apart, under a towering neon shrimp sign. Enter by the beignet wagon, and you’ll find an enormous fish market, which is worth a visit just to gape at the sea-dwelling varieties and their sizes. The humble restaurant next door is 8Captain Joey Patti’s Seafood Restaurant. 8Captain Joey Patti's Seafood Restaurant Google Map: 610 S. C St. Website: http://captainjoeysdeli.com/ 850-434-3193 odd hours/days This low-ceilinged blue bunker has no view of the water. It has no atmosphere. Ceiling fans whirl overhead. You eat over paper place mats with plastic utensils. Start with the thick, fiery seafood gumbo but leave room for heaping platters of fried fish. Mullet — you might know it elsewhere as a bait fish — is a rich-flavored specialty. “Did y’all get coleslaw?” our server asks, sliding crisp, sweet bowls of it across the table. Everything here is fresh. Stick a fork in the fried oysters, and juice jumps out; the oysters melt in your mouth. Did the cheese grits descend from heaven? Maybe so; they are that luscious. My physiological limits vexingly got in the way of what I wanted to do here: eat it all and then some.

While the bill excluded half-bloods and Indians already living in white communities, they went "underground" to escape persecution. No Indians were listed in late 19th and early 20th century censuses for Escambia County. People of Indian descent were forced into the white or black communities by appearance, and officially, in terms of records, "disappeared". It was a pattern repeated in many Southern settlements. Children of white fathers and Indian mothers were not designated as Indian in the late 19th century, whereas children of blacks or mulattos were classified within the black community, related to laws during the slavery years.[14]

Pensacola is a sea port on Pensacola Bay, which connects to the Gulf of Mexico. A large United States Naval Air Station, the first in the United States, is located southwest of Pensacola (near the community of Warrington) and is home to the Blue Angels flight demonstration team and the National Naval Aviation Museum. The main campus of the University of West Florida is situated north of the city center.
The entire island was initially owned by the federal government. In order to promote infrastructure and growth on the island, the federal government leased the lands now encompassing Pensacola Beach to the Santa Rosa Island Authority (SRIA), which in turn has leased the property to homeowners. As a result, all structures on the island have 99-year renewable leases with the SRIA rather than ownership of the land itself.
There are a number of different performance venues in the Pensacola Area, including the Pensacola Bay Center (formerly the Pensacola Civic Center), often used for big ticket events, and the Saenger Theater, used for performances and mid-level events. Other theatres used for live performances, plays, and musicals include the Pensacola Little Theatre, Pensacola State College, University of West Florida, Vinyl Music Hall, and Loblolly Theatre. Pensacola is also home to the Pensacola Opera, Pensacola Children's Chorus, Pensacola Symphony Orchestra, Pensacola Civic Band, Pensacola Bay Concert Band, and the Choral Society of Pensacola, as well as Ballet Pensacola. There is also the Palafox Place entertainment district.
Hotels: Ashton Inn & Suites (910 North Navy Boulevard) (1), Bayou Grande Efficiency Apartments (1801 Heinrich Street Apt 11) (2), Best Western Perdido Key Beach (13585 Perdido Key Drive) (3), Budget Inn (1700 West Cervantes Street) (4), Best Western Pensacola (8240 North Davis Highway) (5), Bay Breeze Restaurant at Ramada Inn (7601 Scenic Highway) (6), American Inn (6400 Mobile Highway) (7), Circle Motel (4222 Mobile Highway) (8), Capital Circle Hotel Company (2601 Wilde Lake Boulevard) (9). Display/hide their approximate locations on the map
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Explore the famous Lighthouse and Museum of Pensacola, and experience vistas of Pensacola Beach unparalleled and unrivalled by any other vantage point. Climb the 177 steps to the top of the lighthouse and check out the impressive view of the Pensacola Pass (the point where Pensacola meets the Gulf of Mexico). Built in 1859, the lighthouse has been part of the Pensacola skyline for hundreds of years.

If you haven’t gotten enough of Pensacola’s sunshine, you’ll find a perfect copy of its blue sky painted on the ceiling of the Spanish Baroque 2Saenger Theatre 2Saenger Theatre Google Map: 118 S. Palafox St. Website: https://www.pensacolasaenger.com/ 850-595-3880 downtown. This jewel of a building, with its soaring white facade and rococo architectural details, opened in 1925 as a vaudeville house and movie theater. The Saenger gradually fell into disrepair and disrepute, known for adult films. “Yes, those kinds of movies,” says Kathy Summerlin, the theater’s director of booking and marketing. After surviving attempts to turn it into a parking garage, it was renovated and is now home to Broadway touring shows; the local symphony, opera and children’s chorus; Ballet Pensacola and a summer movie series. The Saenger’s original pipe organ, with thousands of pipes hidden in the walls, is still played on occasion. Architect Emile Weil possessed a particularly Pensacolan whimsy: Summerlin points out the two plaster soldiers affixed on the walls near the stage, one with a plume on his head, the other with an iguana. One of the plaster ladies is bearded. 
Browse the array of local art at the Artworks Studio & Gallery. There’s jewelry, pottery, canvas works and more on display. The quaint little shop has much to offer, even if you’re on a budget. Meet some artists and admire their work. It’s an ideal place to find some souvenirs and mementos of your vacation. You can even sign up for a painting class if you like the idea of learning. Take a break out of the hot sun, or spend an enjoyable time on a rainy day. If you take the art class, it’s more affordable than many beach activities.
Although the government has changed numerous times throughout Pensacola's history, one thing has remained constant: the region's natural beauty. The beaches facing the Gulf of Mexico are renowned for their white sand and emerald waves. Pensacola provides a gateway to an amazing fishery. Bays are popular with anglers, while offshore fishermen pull up grouper and snapper from the deeper Gulf waters.
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A sidewalk aroma tells you all you need to know about the fried-chicken haven that awaits you inside the 75 Sisters Blues Cafe 75 Sisters Blues Cafe Google Map: 421 W. Belmont St. Website: https://fivesistersbluescafe.com/ 850-912-4856 . This stylish restaurant serves up comfort food galore: The black-eyed peas are soft and velvety; the collards have a tart punch; the grits are so creamy they’re like an emotion. Sweet potatoes raise to ambrosial heights, honeyed and warm. Wash them down with the bloody mary of your dreams: garnished with okra and a fried chicken wing. “It’s your fix for the day,” says co-owner Jean-Pierre N’Dione with a laugh. Born in Senegal, raised in France, he’s lived in Pensacola for 20 years. With his cocktails, food, live music on many evenings and a Sunday jazz brunch, he strives to evoke the spirit of the restaurant’s Belmont-DeVilliers neighborhood. Historically, it was an African American hot spot during segregation. “We owe it to those people,” N’Dione says, “to re-create that atmosphere.” 
Bordering Escambia Bay and Pensacola Bay, the Pensacola metro area is a blend of history and nature. Native Americans have lived in this area for millennia, and the Spanish first arrived in the 16th century. Since then, the area has fallen under quite a few jurisdictions. Pensacola has been known as the "City of Five Flags" for the Spanish, French, British, Confederate and American governments that have laid claim to the region, and every year celebrates this diverse history with a 10-day fiesta.

In 1559, Tristán de Luna y Arellano landed with some 1,500 people on 11 ships from Veracruz, Mexico.[18][16][19][20] The expedition was to establish an outpost, ultimately called Santa María de Ochuse by Luna, as a base for Spanish efforts to colonize Santa Elena (present-day Parris Island, South Carolina.) But the colony was decimated by a hurricane on September 19, 1559,[18][16][20] which killed an unknown number of sailors and colonists, sank six ships, grounded a seventh, and ruined supplies.
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