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A sidewalk aroma tells you all you need to know about the fried-chicken haven that awaits you inside the 75 Sisters Blues Cafe 75 Sisters Blues Cafe Google Map: 421 W. Belmont St. Website: https://fivesistersbluescafe.com/ 850-912-4856 . This stylish restaurant serves up comfort food galore: The black-eyed peas are soft and velvety; the collards have a tart punch; the grits are so creamy they’re like an emotion. Sweet potatoes raise to ambrosial heights, honeyed and warm. Wash them down with the bloody mary of your dreams: garnished with okra and a fried chicken wing. “It’s your fix for the day,” says co-owner Jean-Pierre N’Dione with a laugh. Born in Senegal, raised in France, he’s lived in Pensacola for 20 years. With his cocktails, food, live music on many evenings and a Sunday jazz brunch, he strives to evoke the spirit of the restaurant’s Belmont-DeVilliers neighborhood. Historically, it was an African American hot spot during segregation. “We owe it to those people,” N’Dione says, “to re-create that atmosphere.” 

Churches in Pensacola include: Saint Pauls Church (A), Science Bay Church (B), Allen Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church (C), Spoken Word Church-Apostolic Faith (D), Brentwood Assembly of God (E), East Side Assembly of God Church (F), Pace Assembly of God Church (G), Bahai Faith (H), Antioch Missionary Baptist Church (I). Display/hide their locations on the map
Churches in Pensacola include: Saint Pauls Church (A), Science Bay Church (B), Allen Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church (C), Spoken Word Church-Apostolic Faith (D), Brentwood Assembly of God (E), East Side Assembly of God Church (F), Pace Assembly of God Church (G), Bahai Faith (H), Antioch Missionary Baptist Church (I). Display/hide their locations on the map
“Protect our coast” proclaim the bumper stickers on the cars in the parking lot of 11Ever’man Cooperative Grocery & Cafe 11Ever'man Cooperative Grocery and Cafe Google Map: 315 W. Garden St. Website: https://www.everman.org/ 850-438-0402 , which has carried environmentally sound products and catered to healthy lifestyles since 1973. All of its items adhere to a strict green policy: no MSG, hormones, GMO ingredients, etc. You can grab local organic produce, sandwiches and other fixings for a picnic on the beach, and if you’ve stayed there too long, come back for a chickweed or comfrey salve from Coyote Moon Herb Company to soothe your sunburn. Year-round flowers make honey a popular local product; tupelo flowers grow wild in the Florida Panhandle, and they contribute to a delicate honey that never crystallizes. The coop moved into its current expansive location on West Garden Street in 2014; next door is its education center that offers drop-in classes in cooking and meditation, as well as many tailored to the military community, such as yoga for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder.
After getting settled at your accommodation of choice, you'll likely want to venture out and explore. If you can't wait to check out the beaches, head to Gulf Islands National Seashore or Bayview Beach Park for a relaxing day by the water. Experience the area's live music and biking trails, and make time for local attractions like Portofino Boardwalk and Pensacola Beach Pier. For more things to see and do, consider visiting Fort Pickens or Santa Rosa Island.
Hotels: Ashton Inn & Suites (910 North Navy Boulevard) (1), Bayou Grande Efficiency Apartments (1801 Heinrich Street Apt 11) (2), Best Western Perdido Key Beach (13585 Perdido Key Drive) (3), Budget Inn (1700 West Cervantes Street) (4), Best Western Pensacola (8240 North Davis Highway) (5), Bay Breeze Restaurant at Ramada Inn (7601 Scenic Highway) (6), American Inn (6400 Mobile Highway) (7), Circle Motel (4222 Mobile Highway) (8), Capital Circle Hotel Company (2601 Wilde Lake Boulevard) (9). Display/hide their approximate locations on the map

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The median income for a household in the city was $34,779, and the median income for a family was $42,868. Males had a median income of $32,258 versus $23,582 for females. The per capita income for the city was $30,556 in 2011. About 12.7% of families and 16.3%[48] of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.2% of those under age 18 and 9.2% of those age 65 or over.
In the final stages of the War of 1812, American troops launched an offensive on Pensacola against the Spanish and British garrisons protecting the city, which surrendered after two days of fighting. In 1819, Spain and the United States negotiated the Adams–Onís Treaty, by which Spain sold the Floridas to the United States for US$5 million.[19] A Spanish census of 1820 indicated 181 households in the town, with a third of mixed-blood. The people were predominantly French and Spanish Creole. Indians in the area were noted through records, travelers' accounts, and paintings of the era, including some by George Washington Sully and George Catlin. Creek women were also recorded in marriages to Spanish men, in court records or deeds.[14]
In 1821, with Andrew Jackson as provisional governor, Pensacola became part of the United States.[19] The Creek continued to interact with European Americans and African Americans, but the dominant whites increasingly imposed their binary racial classifications: white and black ("colored", within which were included free people of color, including Indians). However, American Indians and mestizos were identified separately in court and Catholic church records, and as Indians in censuses up until 1840, attesting to their presence in the society. After that, the Creek were not separately identified as Indian, but the people did not disappear. Even after removal of many Seminole to Indian Territory, Indians, often of mixed-race but culturally identifying as Muskogean, lived throughout Florida.[14]
As of the census[7] of 2010, there were 51,923 people, 23,600 households, and 14,665 families residing in the city, and 402,000 people in the Pensacola MSA. The population density was 2,303.5 people per square mile (956.8/km²). There were 26,848 housing units at an average density of 1,189.4 per square mile (459.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city is 66.3% White, 28.0% African American, 2.0% Asian, 0.6% Native American, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 2.3% from two or more races. 3.3% are Hispanic or Latino of any race.
Pensacola Beach for many years remained largely undeveloped. The Casino Resort was the first tourist destination constructed on the island (at the present day location of Casino Beach) where a variety of special events including beauty pageants, fishing tournaments and boxing matches were held from the 30s through 50s. With a bar, tennis courts, bath houses, and a restaurant, it was a popular resort until it eventually closed in the 1960s.

In 1559, Don Tristan de Luna y Arellano led the first settlement of the region.[2] His 11 ships, with 1500 settlers,[2] anchored in the bay and established its colony on the site of today's Naval Air Station Pensacola. A hurricane decimated the colony a few weeks later, killing hundreds and sinking 5 ships.[2] Suffering long-term famine and fighting, this first settlement was finally abandoned in 1561.[2] A presidio was constructed on Santa Rosa Island in 1722 near the location of the more recent Fort Pickens. Hurricanes in 1741 and 1752[3] forced its relocation to the mainland.
The best-known Pensacola culture site in terms of archeology is the Bottle Creek site, a large site located 59 miles (95 km) west of Pensacola north of Mobile, Alabama. This site has at least 18 large earthwork mounds, five of which are arranged around a central plaza. Its main occupation was from 1250 AD to 1550. It was a ceremonial center for the Pensacola people and a gateway to their society. This site would have had easy access by a dugout canoe, the main mode of transportation used by the Pensacola.[15]
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