Margaritaville Beach Hotel – If you are searching for a true destination hotel where you can lay back and savor every minute of your stay like a salt-rimmed tequila cocktail, look no further than Margaritaville. With the silky sand at its feet, the hotel boasts daily entertainment, an on-site beach bar, stand-up paddleboard and beach cruiser rentals, and a therapeutic spa.
Browse the array of local art at the Artworks Studio & Gallery. There’s jewelry, pottery, canvas works and more on display. The quaint little shop has much to offer, even if you’re on a budget. Meet some artists and admire their work. It’s an ideal place to find some souvenirs and mementos of your vacation. You can even sign up for a painting class if you like the idea of learning. Take a break out of the hot sun, or spend an enjoyable time on a rainy day. If you take the art class, it’s more affordable than many beach activities.
In the midst of downtown’s busy Palafox Street is the 9Blue Morning Gallery 9Blue Morning Gallery Google Map: 21 S. Palafox St. Website: http://bluemorninggallery.com/ 850-429-9100 artist’s cooperative, begun in 1997. It’s so full of artwork that when I first stepped in all I saw was a blur of colors; gradually my eyes adjusted to the large array of jewelry, paintings, blown glass, photography and ceramics on display, created by its more than 60 members. Pensacola offers endless inspiration, jeweler Diane Rennie tells me. “We are this little area of art,” she says. She’s a former president of the cooperative and a longtime member. “It’s such an inspiring environment to be in, and there’s a large retirement community here. People find fun things to do, and one of those things is making art.” David Williams is one of them. A jeweler who specializes in opals, he moved to Pensacola in 2010 after living in Georgia and western North Carolina, and says he’s found his forever home. He lives in a 1920s house near Bayou Texar and kayaks in the bay: “I see dolphins every morning.” 
The beach is not just famous and breathtakingly beautiful, with its sugar-white sand and turquoise water; it’s also clean enough to lure several rare species of sea turtles, it’s an inspiration to countless local artists, and it’s a geological reminder of the precarious purity of this region. The 2010 BP oil spill blackened it; its subsequent cleansing coincided with the upswing of growth downtown and a cultural and economic rebirth. Just about everywhere we turned — whether poking into galleries or cafes, or strolling the beach — we felt a buzz of creativity, whimsy and high spirits.
Over $6 billion in damage occurred in the metro area and more than 10,000 homes were destroyed, with another 27,000 heavily damaged. NASA created a comparison image to illustrate the massive damage. Because of the widespread losses, Hurricane Ivan drove up the cost of housing in the area, leading to a severe shortage of affordable housing. In July 2005, Hurricane Dennis made landfall just east of the city, sparing it the damage received from Ivan the year before. However, hurricane and near-hurricane-force winds were recorded in downtown, causing moderate damage.
The survivors struggled to survive, most moving inland to what is now central Alabama for several months in 1560 before returning to the coast; but in 1561, the effort was abandoned.[18][20] Some of the survivors eventually sailed to Santa Elena, but another storm struck there. Survivors made their way to Cuba and finally returned to Pensacola, where the remaining fifty at Pensacola were taken back to Veracruz. The Viceroy's advisers later concluded that northwest Florida was too dangerous to settle. They ignored it for 137 years.[18][20]
Given its location on the Gulf of Mexico, Pensacola's food scene is anchored by fresh seafood, with many area restaurants featuring the catch of the day. Meanwhile, the Wisteria Tavern, which began as a grocery supply store in the 1920s and early '30s, became a tavern in 1935. Serving more than 100 different beers, the tavern has long been popular with anglers coming off the water and hunters returning from the woods.
In 1559, Don Tristan de Luna y Arellano led the first settlement of the region.[2] His 11 ships, with 1500 settlers,[2] anchored in the bay and established its colony on the site of today's Naval Air Station Pensacola. A hurricane decimated the colony a few weeks later, killing hundreds and sinking 5 ships.[2] Suffering long-term famine and fighting, this first settlement was finally abandoned in 1561.[2] A presidio was constructed on Santa Rosa Island in 1722 near the location of the more recent Fort Pickens. Hurricanes in 1741 and 1752[3] forced its relocation to the mainland.
Bordering Escambia Bay and Pensacola Bay, the Pensacola metro area is a blend of history and nature. Native Americans have lived in this area for millennia, and the Spanish first arrived in the 16th century. Since then, the area has fallen under quite a few jurisdictions. Pensacola has been known as the "City of Five Flags" for the Spanish, French, British, Confederate and American governments that have laid claim to the region, and every year celebrates this diverse history with a 10-day fiesta.

Bordering Escambia Bay and Pensacola Bay, the Pensacola metro area is a blend of history and nature. Native Americans have lived in this area for millennia, and the Spanish first arrived in the 16th century. Since then, the area has fallen under quite a few jurisdictions. Pensacola has been known as the "City of Five Flags" for the Spanish, French, British, Confederate and American governments that have laid claim to the region, and every year celebrates this diverse history with a 10-day fiesta.


There is nothing that Pensacola can't do. Whether you are a golfer, shopaholic, outdoor enthusiast or an eternal romantic, there is something for everyone in Pensacola. To start with its beaches are a delight, especially the famous Johnson Beach. If you have kids, then the Pensacola Zoo would be the ideal spot, while for history lovers Fort Pickens acts as the main tourist draw.
Tensions between the white community and Indians tended to increase during the Removal era. In addition, an increasing proportion of Anglo-Americans, who constituted the majority of whites by 1840, led to a hardening of racial discrimination in the area.[14] There was disapproval of white men living with women of color, which had previously been accepted. In 1853 the legislature passed a bill prohibiting Indians from living in the state, and provided for capture and removal to Indian Territory.[14]
In 1559, Don Tristan de Luna y Arellano led the first settlement of the region.[2] His 11 ships, with 1500 settlers,[2] anchored in the bay and established its colony on the site of today's Naval Air Station Pensacola. A hurricane decimated the colony a few weeks later, killing hundreds and sinking 5 ships.[2] Suffering long-term famine and fighting, this first settlement was finally abandoned in 1561.[2] A presidio was constructed on Santa Rosa Island in 1722 near the location of the more recent Fort Pickens. Hurricanes in 1741 and 1752[3] forced its relocation to the mainland.
“Protect our coast” proclaim the bumper stickers on the cars in the parking lot of 11Ever’man Cooperative Grocery & Cafe 11Ever'man Cooperative Grocery and Cafe Google Map: 315 W. Garden St. Website: https://www.everman.org/ 850-438-0402 , which has carried environmentally sound products and catered to healthy lifestyles since 1973. All of its items adhere to a strict green policy: no MSG, hormones, GMO ingredients, etc. You can grab local organic produce, sandwiches and other fixings for a picnic on the beach, and if you’ve stayed there too long, come back for a chickweed or comfrey salve from Coyote Moon Herb Company to soothe your sunburn. Year-round flowers make honey a popular local product; tupelo flowers grow wild in the Florida Panhandle, and they contribute to a delicate honey that never crystallizes. The coop moved into its current expansive location on West Garden Street in 2014; next door is its education center that offers drop-in classes in cooking and meditation, as well as many tailored to the military community, such as yoga for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder.
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In the midst of downtown’s busy Palafox Street is the 9Blue Morning Gallery 9Blue Morning Gallery Google Map: 21 S. Palafox St. Website: http://bluemorninggallery.com/ 850-429-9100 artist’s cooperative, begun in 1997. It’s so full of artwork that when I first stepped in all I saw was a blur of colors; gradually my eyes adjusted to the large array of jewelry, paintings, blown glass, photography and ceramics on display, created by its more than 60 members. Pensacola offers endless inspiration, jeweler Diane Rennie tells me. “We are this little area of art,” she says. She’s a former president of the cooperative and a longtime member. “It’s such an inspiring environment to be in, and there’s a large retirement community here. People find fun things to do, and one of those things is making art.” David Williams is one of them. A jeweler who specializes in opals, he moved to Pensacola in 2010 after living in Georgia and western North Carolina, and says he’s found his forever home. He lives in a 1920s house near Bayou Texar and kayaks in the bay: “I see dolphins every morning.” 
ResortQuest by Wyndham Vacation Rentals in Pensacola Beach continually strives to make your homeowner experience one of individual attention and professionalism and to help your property realize its full investment potential. We pride ourselves on having a local team with global support, making us the best of both worlds and the perfect partner to manage your vacation rental. The high standards to which we hold our people and our properties form the basis of our Vacation Rental Bill of Rights® — a list of six key commitments that every traveler can expect when booking a vacation rental stay with us. Additionally, we offer the Truly Comfortable & Clean program, eliminating comforters and guaranteeing the entire bedding is washed and fresh before each arrival. This alternative to bedspreads will set your vacation rental apart from the competition and ensure the comfort of your guests.
There is one school on Pensacola Beach. The Pensacola Beach Elementary School, within the Escambia County School District (ECSD), is for children from kindergarten through fifth grade. This school has an enrollment ranging from 120 to 140 students. All elementary-school age children on Pensacola Beach are eligible to attend the school. The first year the school was open, for the school year 1977–1978, classes were held in an empty A-frame house. The Pensacola Beach Volunteer Fire Department building was also used in aiding the teachers and administrators. In November 1977, four portable buildings were moved to the present site. They school has received the 5 Star School award since 1998.[citation needed] In 2001 the Pensacola Beach Elementary lost its direct district operational control and became a charter school.[15] In September 2004 Hurricane Ivan destroyed an office and four classrooms. Jeff Castleberry, the principal, argued that ECSD would have closed the school if it had direct operational control. The costs to fix the damage at Pensacola Beach Elementary was $1.5 million. The campus is adjacent to the Gulf of Mexico and is built on stilt. In 2016 Thomas St. Myer of the Pensacola News Journal described it as one of several Escambia County charter schools that "exemplify charter schools at their finest".[16]
“Protect our coast” proclaim the bumper stickers on the cars in the parking lot of 11Ever’man Cooperative Grocery & Cafe 11Ever'man Cooperative Grocery and Cafe Google Map: 315 W. Garden St. Website: https://www.everman.org/ 850-438-0402 , which has carried environmentally sound products and catered to healthy lifestyles since 1973. All of its items adhere to a strict green policy: no MSG, hormones, GMO ingredients, etc. You can grab local organic produce, sandwiches and other fixings for a picnic on the beach, and if you’ve stayed there too long, come back for a chickweed or comfrey salve from Coyote Moon Herb Company to soothe your sunburn. Year-round flowers make honey a popular local product; tupelo flowers grow wild in the Florida Panhandle, and they contribute to a delicate honey that never crystallizes. The coop moved into its current expansive location on West Garden Street in 2014; next door is its education center that offers drop-in classes in cooking and meditation, as well as many tailored to the military community, such as yoga for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder.
The location of the property was amazing. Covered parking was available. Even though we were at the front of the villas we were able to walk to the beach every day. We were also close enough to the attractions at Pensacola beach that it was a very short drive. The neighbors in the same condo we were in were very friendly and polite. Brittany the property manager Was very easy to get in touch with and very helpful.
Explore the famous Lighthouse and Museum of Pensacola, and experience vistas of Pensacola Beach unparalleled and unrivalled by any other vantage point. Climb the 177 steps to the top of the lighthouse and check out the impressive view of the Pensacola Pass (the point where Pensacola meets the Gulf of Mexico). Built in 1859, the lighthouse has been part of the Pensacola skyline for hundreds of years.
Snow is rare in Pensacola, but does occasionally fall. The most recent snowfall event occurred December 9, 2017,[38] and the snow event previous to it occurred on February 12, 2010.[39] The city receives 65.27 inches (1,660 mm) of precipitation per year, with a slightly more rainy season in the summer. The rainiest month is July, with 7.40 inches (188 mm), with May being the driest month at 4.17 inches (106 mm).[33] In June 2012 over one foot (300 mm) of rain fell on Pensacola and adjacent areas, leading to widespread flooding.[40] On April 29, 2014. Pensacola was drenched by at least 20 inches of rain within a 24-hour period, causing the worst flooding in 30 years[41]
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