Bayview Park offers a great place for a family day of fun in the sun. There is also a boat launch spot, which only adds to the many features that this impressive park has on offer. Whether you find yourself enjoying the gazebo, the expanse of lawn, or minding your children as they play in the playground, you’re sure to have a great day when you spend it the Bayview way.
Tensions between the white community and Indians tended to increase during the Removal era. In addition, an increasing proportion of Anglo-Americans, who constituted the majority of whites by 1840, led to a hardening of racial discrimination in the area.[14] There was disapproval of white men living with women of color, which had previously been accepted. In 1853 the legislature passed a bill prohibiting Indians from living in the state, and provided for capture and removal to Indian Territory.[14]
The best-known Pensacola culture site in terms of archeology is the Bottle Creek site, a large site located 59 miles (95 km) west of Pensacola north of Mobile, Alabama. This site has at least 18 large earthwork mounds, five of which are arranged around a central plaza. Its main occupation was from 1250 AD to 1550. It was a ceremonial center for the Pensacola people and a gateway to their society. This site would have had easy access by a dugout canoe, the main mode of transportation used by the Pensacola.[15]
There is the self-guided tour, where experienced guides will assist you in planning the best routes to take, to explore the historic district at your own leisure. There is also a guided tour, which lasts approximately 1-1.5 hours, and happens from Tuesday to Saturday, from 11.00am to 1.00pm. Themed tours are also available, Tuesday to Saturday, from 2.30pm. Visitors looking to experience this novelty tour are requested to meet at the Tivoli High House at 2.30pm sharp.
Pensacola loves its Blue Angels; you’ll find pictures of the blue-and-gold aircraft painted on local bridges. Head west of the city to visit their home base, Naval Air Station Pensacola, where practices start up again in March. The base also hosts the 4National Naval Aviation Museum, 4National Naval Aviation Museum Google Map: 1750 Radford Blvd., Naval Air Station Pensacola Website: http://www.navalaviationmuseum.org/ 850-452-3604 or 850-452-3606 open year-round. It’s the world’s largest, and you can easily spend half a day or more among its minutely detailed aircraft carrier models and restored aircraft, including the World War II Corsair, nicknamed “Whistling Death,” with its unique inverted gull wing, and the Que Sera Sera, the first aircraft to land at the South Pole. “Home Front U.S.A.,” an exhibit of small-town life in 1943, re-creates a street lined with wartime grocery and barber shops, full of vintage treasures. At the museum’s heart is a 10,000-square-foot atrium, where four historic Blue Angels aircraft hang overhead in perfect formation. Admission is free. 
Larry Cowan likes to quote an old Southern saying, used to calm people down: “Don’t worry, it’s going to come together like goat lips.” He says it so often that when he opened his deli turned beer garden, friends dared him to call it Goat Lips. He did. He regretted it at first: “It’s just not appetizing. But it’s turned out to be an asset. It’s memorable.” Thus was 5Goat Lips Chew & Brewhouse 5Goat Lips Chew and Brewhouse Google Map: 2811 Copter Rd. Website: http://www.goatlips.com/ 850-474-1919 born. It houses a small “nanobrewery,” which turns out a half-dozen or so beers on tap. The most unusual — and my favorite — is the jalapeño cream ale. Most breweries don’t offer food, but Goat Lips has a full menu, featuring giant muffuletta sandwiches — a half fills a plate and rises, oh, four to six inches on a base of Gambino’s bread delivered from New Orleans, with layers of mortadella, salami, provolone cheese and olive relish. Then it’s baked, so the edges of the meat get crispy. The shrimp Creole is peppery and rich; the menu also features comfort-food staples, meatloaf, pot roast. Goat Lips has a mellow, casual vibe. Cowan likes bonfires and makes them big enough to withstand even a light rain. The covered back deck is a popular spot for live bands and a weekly Trivia Night — which my husband and I stumbled upon and were immediately swept up in. Out back there’s a statue of a goat carved out of cypress wood, elevated on a little platform. Says Cowan with a laugh, “I’m afraid it’s going to be my tombstone one day.”
The beach and water were beautiful and the water felt wonderful. The one convenient store we saw was very busy, hard to get in and out of the parking lot with all the traffic. It was easy to get around otherwise. We visited the fort and enjoyed that historic excursion. Not able to see much because we were there for a short time and busy with attending wedding activities, so not really a great review. Although, I wouldn’t mind going back for a longer stay.

Tourist attractions: Dial-A-Story (Cultural Attractions- Events- & Facilities; 200 West Gregory Street) (1), Advanced Amusement of Northwest Florida (Amusement & Theme Parks; 6215 North 9th Avenue) (2), Fast Eddies Fun Center (505 West Michigan Avenue) (3), 101 Things To DO (315 South Palafox Street) (4), Dinosaur Adventure Land (5800 North Palafox Street) (5), First City Fun Center (65 East Olive Road) (6), Dreamland Skating Center Inc - Main OFC (2607 East Olive Road) (7), Balloon Port of Pensacola (6548 Mobile Highway) (8). Display/hide their approximate locations on the map


Pensacola is located at 30°26′13″N 87°12′33″W (30.436988, −87.209277),[28] on the north side of Pensacola Bay. It is 59 miles (95 km) east of Mobile, Alabama, and 196 miles (315 km) west of Tallahassee, the capital of Florida. According to the United States Census Bureau, Pensacola has a total area of 40.7 square miles (105.4 km2), consisting of 22.5 square miles (58.4 km2) of land and 18.1 square miles (47.0 km2), 44.62%, water.[29]

In 1559, Tristán de Luna y Arellano landed with some 1,500 people on 11 ships from Veracruz, Mexico.[18][16][19][20] The expedition was to establish an outpost, ultimately called Santa María de Ochuse by Luna, as a base for Spanish efforts to colonize Santa Elena (present-day Parris Island, South Carolina.) But the colony was decimated by a hurricane on September 19, 1559,[18][16][20] which killed an unknown number of sailors and colonists, sank six ships, grounded a seventh, and ruined supplies.
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