Tensions between the white community and Indians tended to increase during the Removal era. In addition, an increasing proportion of Anglo-Americans, who constituted the majority of whites by 1840, led to a hardening of racial discrimination in the area.[14] There was disapproval of white men living with women of color, which had previously been accepted. In 1853 the legislature passed a bill prohibiting Indians from living in the state, and provided for capture and removal to Indian Territory.[14]
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As a community located on a low-lying barrier island, Pensacola Beach is vulnerable to hurricanes. Landfalling storms have been known to drive storm surge over the island, damaging or destroying man made structures and causing beach erosion. In 1995, two hurricanes made landfall on the island. Hurricane Erin made landfall in August while Hurricane Opal blasted the island just two months later, leveling some dunes and destroying a number of homes.


Yvette Crooke-Avera started making soap in her kitchen and selling it online six years ago. Her pretty 12Belle Ame Bath & Body 12Belle Ame Bath and Body Google Map: 112 Palafox Pl. Website: https://www.belleame.com/ 850-912-8240 offers a dizzying assortment of brightly colored soaps and scrubs made with pure essential oils and ingredients such as mango, shea butter and coconut oil. In fact, the shelves, tables and trays piled with attractively homey, glistening and frosted products look (and smell) more like dessert than cleansers. I am partial to her Sugar Scrub Mousse Bar, which feels like a firm marshmallow; you break off a piece and lather up with it, and it becomes like foamy silk on your skin. She also stocks bath bombs and salt polishes, luxury shower caps and — of course — Blue Angels shirts, flags, hats and towels.
After the Civil War, Pensacola, like the rest of the South was controlled by Republicans during the Reconstruction era (1865-1877). The Republican government had numerous African American politicians, including several county commissioners, city aldermen, constables, state representatives, and even one African American mayor—Salvador Pons. However, with the 1884 election of native Pensacolian and former Confederate General Edward Perry, a dramatic shift occurred. Perry, a Democrat who actually lost the Escambia County vote during the statewide election, acted to dissolve the Republican city government of Pensacola and in 1885 replaced this government with hand-picked successors, including railroad magnate William D. Chipley. The only African American to remain in city government was George Washington Witherspoon, a pastor with the African Methodist Episcopal Church who was previously a Republican and switched parties to the Democrats. Following Governor Perry's dissolution of the Republican government, the city remained Democratic for more than a century after the Civil War with no African Americans serving in an elected capacity for nearly a century.
St. Michael's Cemetery was established in the 18th century at a location in a south central part of the city, which developed as the Downtown area. Initially owned by the Church of St. Michael, it is now owned and managed by St. Michael's Cemetery Foundation of Pensacola, Inc.[27] Preliminary studies indicate that there are over 3,200 marked burials as well as a large number unmarked.[27]
You’ve just discovered one of the most popular hotels in Pensacola Beach, FL. Our beautiful hotel is just a few footprints in the sand away from warm Gulf of Mexico waters and cool sea breezes on the spectacular barrier island of Pensacola Beach. Even though we are situated right on the beach, it’s very easy to get here from Interstate 10 and the Pensacola Gulf Coast Regional Airport.
Weather statistics since the late 20th century have been recorded at the airport. The city has seen single digit temperatures (below −12 °C) on three occasions: 5 °F (−15 °C) on January 21, 1985, 7 °F (−14 °C) on February 13, 1899 and 8 °F (−13 °C) on January 11, 1982.[31] According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Pensacola has a humid subtropical climate,[32] (Köppen Cfa), with short, mild winters and hot, humid summers. Typical summer conditions have highs in the lower 90s °F (32–34 °C) and lows in the mid 70s °F (23–24 °C).[33] Afternoon or evening thunderstorms are common during the summer months. Due partly to the coastal location, temperatures above 100 °F (38 °C) are relatively rare, and last occurred in June 2011, when two of the first four days of the month recorded highs reaching the century mark.[34] The highest temperature ever recorded in the city was 106 °F (41 °C) on July 14, 1980.[33] The daily average temperature in January is 51.4 °F (10.8 °C); freezing temperatures occur on an average 13.7 nights per season, with the average window for freezing conditions being from December 13 to February 20.[35] Temperatures below 20 °F (−7 °C) are very rare, and last occurred on January 8, 2015,[36] when a low of 19 °F (−7 °C) was seen.[37] The lowest temperature ever recorded in the city was 5 °F (−15 °C) on January 21, 1985.[33]
Take in the impressive views and explore the Pensacola Beach Eco-trail. This 8.5 miles (13.7 km) of natural surrounds, also known as ‘Footprints in the Sand Eco-trail’, is a great way to spend the day with the kids, or to get out and experience beach life. This fantastic eco-trail is great for learning all about the indigenous flora and fauna of the vicinity, not limited to but including turtles, tropical fish, dolphins, sharks, and birds.
Wyndham Vacation Rentals' Key to the Beach is your passport to even more fun and excitement in Northwest Florida. Through our Key to the Beach program, we are pleased to offer our guests benefits at a number of shows, restaurants and attractions. Simply stop by one of the Wyndham Vacation Rentals check-in offices to pick up your Key to the Beach card during your stay, and present it at any of the participating area businesses.
Located north of the Bayou Texar from downtown Pensacola, the Pensacola International Airport is serviced by American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, Silver Airways, Southwest Airlines and United Airlines. Nonstop flights are available to major destinations around the country, including Houston, the District of Columbia and Miami. There is also a Greyhound bus terminal north of downtown near the intersection of Route 29 and Interstate 10.
The entire island was initially owned by the federal government. In order to promote infrastructure and growth on the island, the federal government leased the lands now encompassing Pensacola Beach to the Santa Rosa Island Authority (SRIA), which in turn has leased the property to homeowners. As a result, all structures on the island have 99-year renewable leases with the SRIA rather than ownership of the land itself.
Weather statistics since the late 20th century have been recorded at the airport. The city has seen single digit temperatures (below −12 °C) on three occasions: 5 °F (−15 °C) on January 21, 1985, 7 °F (−14 °C) on February 13, 1899 and 8 °F (−13 °C) on January 11, 1982.[31] According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Pensacola has a humid subtropical climate,[32] (Köppen Cfa), with short, mild winters and hot, humid summers. Typical summer conditions have highs in the lower 90s °F (32–34 °C) and lows in the mid 70s °F (23–24 °C).[33] Afternoon or evening thunderstorms are common during the summer months. Due partly to the coastal location, temperatures above 100 °F (38 °C) are relatively rare, and last occurred in June 2011, when two of the first four days of the month recorded highs reaching the century mark.[34] The highest temperature ever recorded in the city was 106 °F (41 °C) on July 14, 1980.[33] The daily average temperature in January is 51.4 °F (10.8 °C); freezing temperatures occur on an average 13.7 nights per season, with the average window for freezing conditions being from December 13 to February 20.[35] Temperatures below 20 °F (−7 °C) are very rare, and last occurred on January 8, 2015,[36] when a low of 19 °F (−7 °C) was seen.[37] The lowest temperature ever recorded in the city was 5 °F (−15 °C) on January 21, 1985.[33]
During the early years of settlement, a tri-racial creole society developed. As a fortified trading post, the Spanish had mostly men stationed here. Some married or had unions with Pensacola, Creek or African women, both slave and free, and their descendants created a mixed-race population of mestizos and mulattos. The Spanish encouraged slaves from the southern British colonies to come to Florida as a refuge, promising freedom in exchange for conversion to Catholicism. King Charles II of Spain issued a royal proclamation freeing all slaves who fled to Spanish Florida and accepted conversion and baptism. Most went to the area around St. Augustine, but escaped slaves also reached Pensacola. St. Augustine had mustered an all-black militia unit defending Spain as early as 1683.[23]
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