Pensacola and several surrounding areas were devastated by Hurricane Ivan. Pensacola was on the eastern side of the eyewall, which sent a large storm surge into Escambia Bay; this destroyed most of the I-10 Escambia Bay Bridge. The storm knocked 58 spans off the eastbound and westbound bridges and misaligned another 66 spans, forcing the bridge to close to traffic in both directions.[43] The surge also destroyed the fishing bridge that spanned Pensacola Bay alongside the Phillip Beale Memorial Bridge, locally known as the Three Mile Bridge.[44]
Given its location on the Gulf of Mexico, Pensacola's food scene is anchored by fresh seafood, with many area restaurants featuring the catch of the day. Meanwhile, the Wisteria Tavern, which began as a grocery supply store in the 1920s and early '30s, became a tavern in 1935. Serving more than 100 different beers, the tavern has long been popular with anglers coming off the water and hunters returning from the woods.
Our Pensacola vacation homes and condominiums are located near the most beautiful beaches and vibrant locations, and many are close to exciting attractions. Whether you are going to the beach on vacation or a special family and friends event, make sure you easily book your perfect Pensacola vacation home online with us to enjoy exclusive Hotels.com perks. 

Of all the hotels in Pensacola, FL, on the beach, Days Inn Pensacola Beach will delight you most with spacious guest rooms tastefully decorated in warm, earth tones with light pastel accents. Each room opens to a balcony or deck. Whether you’re here on vacation or business, you’ll enjoy thoughtful amenities that show we understand what you need when you’re away from home.
As of the census[7] of 2010, there were 51,923 people, 23,600 households, and 14,665 families residing in the city, and 402,000 people in the Pensacola MSA. The population density was 2,303.5 people per square mile (956.8/km²). There were 26,848 housing units at an average density of 1,189.4 per square mile (459.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city is 66.3% White, 28.0% African American, 2.0% Asian, 0.6% Native American, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 2.3% from two or more races. 3.3% are Hispanic or Latino of any race.
There are a number of annual festivals, events, historic tours, and landmarks. The Pensacola Seafood Festival and The Pensacola Crawfish Festival held in the heart of historic Downtown has been held for nearly 30 years with live music acts. The Great Gulfcoast Arts Festival is held annually in November in Seville Square often drawing more than 200 regional and international artists as well as The Children's Art Festival which is held in the same park featuring art by children from local area schools. Pensacon is an annual comic convention held each February, that brings in close to 25,000 people from all around the world.
* Prices reflect the lowest "base rate" found over the next 30 days. Rates are subject to change and may not include taxes and fees, hotel service charges, extra person charges, or incidentals, such as room service. All rates are displayed in USD unless otherwise noted. Converted rates are provided for your convenience. They are based on today's exchange rate, but the hotel will charge you in the local currency.
As a community located on a low-lying barrier island, Pensacola Beach is vulnerable to hurricanes. Landfalling storms have been known to drive storm surge over the island, damaging or destroying man made structures and causing beach erosion. In 1995, two hurricanes made landfall on the island. Hurricane Erin made landfall in August while Hurricane Opal blasted the island just two months later, leveling some dunes and destroying a number of homes.
You’ve just discovered one of the most popular hotels in Pensacola Beach, FL. Our beautiful hotel is just a few footprints in the sand away from warm Gulf of Mexico waters and cool sea breezes on the spectacular barrier island of Pensacola Beach. Even though we are situated right on the beach, it’s very easy to get here from Interstate 10 and the Pensacola Gulf Coast Regional Airport.

There is nothing that Pensacola can't do. Whether you are a golfer, shopaholic, outdoor enthusiast or an eternal romantic, there is something for everyone in Pensacola. To start with its beaches are a delight, especially the famous Johnson Beach. If you have kids, then the Pensacola Zoo would be the ideal spot, while for history lovers Fort Pickens acts as the main tourist draw.
10Waterboyz 10Waterboyz Google Map: 380 N. 9th Ave. Website: https://www.visitpensacola.com/listing/waterboyz-skate-park/1607/ 850-433-2929 isn’t just a surf shop; it’s a community hub. When owner Sean Fell moved from selling surfboards out of his garage to a retail space, he knew he needed something special to compete against the Internet. Along with the surfboards, rash-guard shirts, sunscreen, hats, sandals and any surfing supplies a beach-bound body could desire, he added an indoor skate park. Then the recession hit, followed by the BP oil spill, and as business began to slide, Fell came up with another idea: a cafe “to go along with our scene,” he says. “We base it off food that we ate on surf trips to Central America and Hawaii — fresh and healthy, no fries.” Among Cafe Single Fin’s offerings are Sunzal chicken tacos, named for the famed El Salvador wave, and the Pavones acai bowl, after the Costa Rican surf spot.
Churches in Pensacola include: Saint Pauls Church (A), Science Bay Church (B), Allen Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church (C), Spoken Word Church-Apostolic Faith (D), Brentwood Assembly of God (E), East Side Assembly of God Church (F), Pace Assembly of God Church (G), Bahai Faith (H), Antioch Missionary Baptist Church (I). Display/hide their locations on the map
Pensacola loves its Blue Angels; you’ll find pictures of the blue-and-gold aircraft painted on local bridges. Head west of the city to visit their home base, Naval Air Station Pensacola, where practices start up again in March. The base also hosts the 4National Naval Aviation Museum, 4National Naval Aviation Museum Google Map: 1750 Radford Blvd., Naval Air Station Pensacola Website: http://www.navalaviationmuseum.org/ 850-452-3604 or 850-452-3606 open year-round. It’s the world’s largest, and you can easily spend half a day or more among its minutely detailed aircraft carrier models and restored aircraft, including the World War II Corsair, nicknamed “Whistling Death,” with its unique inverted gull wing, and the Que Sera Sera, the first aircraft to land at the South Pole. “Home Front U.S.A.,” an exhibit of small-town life in 1943, re-creates a street lined with wartime grocery and barber shops, full of vintage treasures. At the museum’s heart is a 10,000-square-foot atrium, where four historic Blue Angels aircraft hang overhead in perfect formation. Admission is free. 
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Tourist attractions: Dial-A-Story (Cultural Attractions- Events- & Facilities; 200 West Gregory Street) (1), Advanced Amusement of Northwest Florida (Amusement & Theme Parks; 6215 North 9th Avenue) (2), Fast Eddies Fun Center (505 West Michigan Avenue) (3), 101 Things To DO (315 South Palafox Street) (4), Dinosaur Adventure Land (5800 North Palafox Street) (5), First City Fun Center (65 East Olive Road) (6), Dreamland Skating Center Inc - Main OFC (2607 East Olive Road) (7), Balloon Port of Pensacola (6548 Mobile Highway) (8). Display/hide their approximate locations on the map
The entire island was initially owned by the federal government. In order to promote infrastructure and growth on the island, the federal government leased the lands now encompassing Pensacola Beach to the Santa Rosa Island Authority (SRIA), which in turn has leased the property to homeowners. As a result, all structures on the island have 99-year renewable leases with the SRIA rather than ownership of the land itself.

^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h Jane E. Dysart, "Another Road to Disappearance: Assimilation of Creek Indians in Pensacola, Florida during the Nineteenth Century", The Florida Historical Quarterly, Vol. 61, No. 1 (July 1982), pp. 37–48, Published by: Florida Historical Society, Article Stable URL: https://www.jstor.org/stable/30146156, accessed 26 June 2014


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A sidewalk aroma tells you all you need to know about the fried-chicken haven that awaits you inside the 75 Sisters Blues Cafe 75 Sisters Blues Cafe Google Map: 421 W. Belmont St. Website: https://fivesistersbluescafe.com/ 850-912-4856 . This stylish restaurant serves up comfort food galore: The black-eyed peas are soft and velvety; the collards have a tart punch; the grits are so creamy they’re like an emotion. Sweet potatoes raise to ambrosial heights, honeyed and warm. Wash them down with the bloody mary of your dreams: garnished with okra and a fried chicken wing. “It’s your fix for the day,” says co-owner Jean-Pierre N’Dione with a laugh. Born in Senegal, raised in France, he’s lived in Pensacola for 20 years. With his cocktails, food, live music on many evenings and a Sunday jazz brunch, he strives to evoke the spirit of the restaurant’s Belmont-DeVilliers neighborhood. Historically, it was an African American hot spot during segregation. “We owe it to those people,” N’Dione says, “to re-create that atmosphere.” 
In the final stages of the War of 1812, American troops launched an offensive on Pensacola against the Spanish and British garrisons protecting the city, which surrendered after two days of fighting. In 1819, Spain and the United States negotiated the Adams–Onís Treaty, by which Spain sold the Floridas to the United States for US$5 million.[19] A Spanish census of 1820 indicated 181 households in the town, with a third of mixed-blood. The people were predominantly French and Spanish Creole. Indians in the area were noted through records, travelers' accounts, and paintings of the era, including some by George Washington Sully and George Catlin. Creek women were also recorded in marriages to Spanish men, in court records or deeds.[14]
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