Located on Little Sabine Bay, this Pensacola hotel is located across the street from a private beach and has an outdoor pool. Absolutely loved it! Weekend breakfast was awesome, room was clean, staff was great! They have bicycles, kayaks & paddle boards to use for free! Just make sure you reserve them w/ the front desk! Oh! Got a $10 credit for not using housekeeping! Just make sure you let them know at check out...
There were 24,524 households out of which 24.6% had children living with them, 39.7% were married couples living together, 16.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.2% were non-families. 32.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.27 and the average family size was 2.92.
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Pensacola is home to a small (0.2% of city residents)[46] but significant Jewish community, whose roots date mostly to German Jewish immigrants of the mid-to-late 19th century. There were also Sephardic Jewish migrants from other areas of the South, and immigrants from other areas of Europe. The first Florida chapter of B'nai Brith was founded downtown in 1874, as well as the first temple, Beth-El, in 1876. Apart from the Reform Beth-El, Pensacola is also served by the Conservative B'nai Israel Synagogue.[47] Paula Ackerman, the first woman who performed rabbinical functions in the United States, was a Pensacola native and led services at Beth-El.
Bayview Park offers a great place for a family day of fun in the sun. There is also a boat launch spot, which only adds to the many features that this impressive park has on offer. Whether you find yourself enjoying the gazebo, the expanse of lawn, or minding your children as they play in the playground, you’re sure to have a great day when you spend it the Bayview way.
Explore the history and charm of one of the oldest settlements in the South while staying at the beach in our Pensacola Beach vacation rentals.  Choose from a variety of beach front and beach access condos, resorts and vacation homes, some offering a simple beach vacation while others boast an abundance of amenities and activities directly on-site. That’s just how Pensacola Beach is ~ an eclectic mix appealing to every type traveler.
As a community located on a low-lying barrier island, Pensacola Beach is vulnerable to hurricanes. Landfalling storms have been known to drive storm surge over the island, damaging or destroying man made structures and causing beach erosion. In 1995, two hurricanes made landfall on the island. Hurricane Erin made landfall in August while Hurricane Opal blasted the island just two months later, leveling some dunes and destroying a number of homes.

During the early years of settlement, a tri-racial creole society developed. As a fortified trading post, the Spanish had mostly men stationed here. Some married or had unions with Pensacola, Creek or African women, both slave and free, and their descendants created a mixed-race population of mestizos and mulattos. The Spanish encouraged slaves from the southern British colonies to come to Florida as a refuge, promising freedom in exchange for conversion to Catholicism. King Charles II of Spain issued a royal proclamation freeing all slaves who fled to Spanish Florida and accepted conversion and baptism. Most went to the area around St. Augustine, but escaped slaves also reached Pensacola. St. Augustine had mustered an all-black militia unit defending Spain as early as 1683.[23]


There are a number of annual festivals, events, historic tours, and landmarks. The Pensacola Seafood Festival and The Pensacola Crawfish Festival held in the heart of historic Downtown has been held for nearly 30 years with live music acts. The Great Gulfcoast Arts Festival is held annually in November in Seville Square often drawing more than 200 regional and international artists as well as The Children's Art Festival which is held in the same park featuring art by children from local area schools. Pensacon is an annual comic convention held each February, that brings in close to 25,000 people from all around the world.
Take in the impressive views and explore the Pensacola Beach Eco-trail. This 8.5 miles (13.7 km) of natural surrounds, also known as ‘Footprints in the Sand Eco-trail’, is a great way to spend the day with the kids, or to get out and experience beach life. This fantastic eco-trail is great for learning all about the indigenous flora and fauna of the vicinity, not limited to but including turtles, tropical fish, dolphins, sharks, and birds.
After the Civil War, Pensacola, like the rest of the South was controlled by Republicans during the Reconstruction era (1865-1877). The Republican government had numerous African American politicians, including several county commissioners, city aldermen, constables, state representatives, and even one African American mayor—Salvador Pons. However, with the 1884 election of native Pensacolian and former Confederate General Edward Perry, a dramatic shift occurred. Perry, a Democrat who actually lost the Escambia County vote during the statewide election, acted to dissolve the Republican city government of Pensacola and in 1885 replaced this government with hand-picked successors, including railroad magnate William D. Chipley. The only African American to remain in city government was George Washington Witherspoon, a pastor with the African Methodist Episcopal Church who was previously a Republican and switched parties to the Democrats. Following Governor Perry's dissolution of the Republican government, the city remained Democratic for more than a century after the Civil War with no African Americans serving in an elected capacity for nearly a century.
As was the case in most of Florida, the Democratic primary was the real contest for most state and local elections until the 1970s. However, from the 1960s onward, due in part to the Republican Party's Southern strategy, residents of this staunchly conservative military and Bible Belt city began splitting their tickets and voting Republican in national elections. Despite this, Democrats continued to win most elections at the state and local level well into the 1990s, though most of them were very conservative even by Southern Democratic standards.
“You turn the lights on, and they come every which way, like roaches,” says Renee Mack, speaking with crusty affection of her customers at 6Paradise Bar & Grill 6Paradise Bar and Grill Google Map: 21 Via De Luna Website: http://www.paradisebar-grill.com/ 850-916-5087 . “They come by boat, by foot, by golf cart, by Jet Ski.” Paradise is an authentic little hideaway on the bay side of Pensacola Beach, a restaurant, bar and vintage motel. You can swim up if you like. Bring a wet dog. Hang up your own hammock or lounge at one of the picnic tables under an umbrella. Paradise has an old-Florida feel. There’s no view of the high-rises, just a good look at that gentle bay surf. Evenings, locals gather to hear a live band and dance in the sand of the private beach. Mack moved to Pensacola in 1984 from New Orleans and brought some Big Easy traditions with her, such as a penchant for the blues and oyster po’ boys, featured on the menu. Her biggest seller is Renee’s Shrimp Salad, from her grandmother’s recipe, made with fresh, wild-caught Gulf shrimp. It’s kicky Cajun flavor comes from fresh herbs. The special sauce in her bushwackers? “We put in a lot of liquor — a lot of rum. And real soft-serve ice cream — none of that powdered stuff.” Mack, as you might gather, likes to keep things simple. Bad weather gets a shrug. “We roll,” she says. “We don’t close down.”
Pensacola and several surrounding areas were devastated by Hurricane Ivan. Pensacola was on the eastern side of the eyewall, which sent a large storm surge into Escambia Bay; this destroyed most of the I-10 Escambia Bay Bridge. The storm knocked 58 spans off the eastbound and westbound bridges and misaligned another 66 spans, forcing the bridge to close to traffic in both directions.[43] The surge also destroyed the fishing bridge that spanned Pensacola Bay alongside the Phillip Beale Memorial Bridge, locally known as the Three Mile Bridge.[44]
It could be a comedy, tragedy or musical, time at Saenger Theatre is a great way to while away a few hours. Need some more options? Veterans Memorial Park is a remarkable structure that stands as a reminder of past events. But that's not all! Does it leave you with an impression? What was the artist trying to achieve? Ask yourself these and other questions as you walk the corridors of Pensacola Museum of Art, a well-liked art institution.
In the midst of downtown’s busy Palafox Street is the 9Blue Morning Gallery 9Blue Morning Gallery Google Map: 21 S. Palafox St. Website: http://bluemorninggallery.com/ 850-429-9100 artist’s cooperative, begun in 1997. It’s so full of artwork that when I first stepped in all I saw was a blur of colors; gradually my eyes adjusted to the large array of jewelry, paintings, blown glass, photography and ceramics on display, created by its more than 60 members. Pensacola offers endless inspiration, jeweler Diane Rennie tells me. “We are this little area of art,” she says. She’s a former president of the cooperative and a longtime member. “It’s such an inspiring environment to be in, and there’s a large retirement community here. People find fun things to do, and one of those things is making art.” David Williams is one of them. A jeweler who specializes in opals, he moved to Pensacola in 2010 after living in Georgia and western North Carolina, and says he’s found his forever home. He lives in a 1920s house near Bayou Texar and kayaks in the bay: “I see dolphins every morning.” 

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Located on Little Sabine Bay, this Pensacola hotel is located across the street from a private beach and has an outdoor pool. Absolutely loved it! Weekend breakfast was awesome, room was clean, staff was great! They have bicycles, kayaks & paddle boards to use for free! Just make sure you reserve them w/ the front desk! Oh! Got a $10 credit for not using housekeeping! Just make sure you let them know at check out...

There is the self-guided tour, where experienced guides will assist you in planning the best routes to take, to explore the historic district at your own leisure. There is also a guided tour, which lasts approximately 1-1.5 hours, and happens from Tuesday to Saturday, from 11.00am to 1.00pm. Themed tours are also available, Tuesday to Saturday, from 2.30pm. Visitors looking to experience this novelty tour are requested to meet at the Tivoli High House at 2.30pm sharp.
Margaritaville Beach Hotel – If you are searching for a true destination hotel where you can lay back and savor every minute of your stay like a salt-rimmed tequila cocktail, look no further than Margaritaville. With the silky sand at its feet, the hotel boasts daily entertainment, an on-site beach bar, stand-up paddleboard and beach cruiser rentals, and a therapeutic spa.
Most residents choose to navigate the metro area by car. A number of major thoroughfares traverse the region: Interstate 110 runs north to south, connecting central Pensacola with Interstate 10, which moves east to west across Florida. Meanwhile, Routes 29, 90 and 98 link the downtown area with nearby communities like Ensley, Myrtle Grove and Bellview. Those who don't have a car can rely on the Escambia County Area Transit, or ECAT, system, which operates bus and trolley routes throughout the greater Pensacola area. However, access to the transit system becomes less extensive the farther you are from central Pensacola.

From early 1993 through August 2005 Pensacola was served by the tri-weekly Amtrak Sunset Limited, but service east of New Orleans to Jacksonville and Orlando was suspended due to damage to the rail line of CSX during Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Attempts are being made to have service restored. This was previously the route of the Gulf Wind operated by the Louisville and Nashville Railroad.[57][58]


The event calendar in Pensacola is full of fun festivals, signature shows, and sensational celebrations. The FooFoo Festival is as unique as any local fete we have ever found. The diverse combination of art, culture, and cuisine features everything from open-air opera to a Big Green Egg cooking competition. The Summer Music Series fills the sunset-sky with the sounds of free live-music at this weekly outdoor concert. As the summer winds down, the flavors heat up at the Pensacola Seafood Festival where 100,000 of your closest friends come together for three days to celebrate the bounties of the Gulf. Finally, the city’s premier event—the Blue Angel Homecoming Show—celebrates the area’s Naval aviation history every November with the Blue Angels performing their aerial acrobatics for all to see.
The original inhabitants of the Pensacola Bay area were Native American peoples. At the time of European contact, a Muskogean-speaking tribe known to the Spanish as the Pensacola lived in the region. This name was not recorded until 1677, but the tribe appears to be the source of the name "Pensacola" for the bay and thence the city.[13] Creek people, also Muskogean-speaking, came regularly from present-day southern Alabama to trade, so the peoples were part of a broader regional and even continental network of relations.[14]
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