The area was originally inhabited by Muskogean language peoples. The Pensacola people lived there at the time of European contact, and Creek people frequently visited and traded from present-day southern Alabama. Spanish explorer Tristán de Luna founded a short-lived settlement in 1559.[12] In 1698 the Spanish established a presidio in the area, from which the modern city gradually developed. The area changed hands several times as European powers competed in North America. During Florida's British rule (1763–1781), fortifications were strengthened.

Margaritaville Beach Hotel – If you are searching for a true destination hotel where you can lay back and savor every minute of your stay like a salt-rimmed tequila cocktail, look no further than Margaritaville. With the silky sand at its feet, the hotel boasts daily entertainment, an on-site beach bar, stand-up paddleboard and beach cruiser rentals, and a therapeutic spa.
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The white sand was so fluffy! It was so clean and didn't burn our feet. The water was beautiful and it was the perfect temperature. There weren't a whole lot of waves to jump, but it was still fun and relaxing. The Blue Angels practice on Tuesdays and Wednesdays depending upon their schedule and the weather. I highly recommend making time for this privilege!

Larry Cowan likes to quote an old Southern saying, used to calm people down: “Don’t worry, it’s going to come together like goat lips.” He says it so often that when he opened his deli turned beer garden, friends dared him to call it Goat Lips. He did. He regretted it at first: “It’s just not appetizing. But it’s turned out to be an asset. It’s memorable.” Thus was 5Goat Lips Chew & Brewhouse 5Goat Lips Chew and Brewhouse Google Map: 2811 Copter Rd. Website: http://www.goatlips.com/ 850-474-1919 born. It houses a small “nanobrewery,” which turns out a half-dozen or so beers on tap. The most unusual — and my favorite — is the jalapeño cream ale. Most breweries don’t offer food, but Goat Lips has a full menu, featuring giant muffuletta sandwiches — a half fills a plate and rises, oh, four to six inches on a base of Gambino’s bread delivered from New Orleans, with layers of mortadella, salami, provolone cheese and olive relish. Then it’s baked, so the edges of the meat get crispy. The shrimp Creole is peppery and rich; the menu also features comfort-food staples, meatloaf, pot roast. Goat Lips has a mellow, casual vibe. Cowan likes bonfires and makes them big enough to withstand even a light rain. The covered back deck is a popular spot for live bands and a weekly Trivia Night — which my husband and I stumbled upon and were immediately swept up in. Out back there’s a statue of a goat carved out of cypress wood, elevated on a little platform. Says Cowan with a laugh, “I’m afraid it’s going to be my tombstone one day.”

Pensacola is home to a small (0.2% of city residents)[46] but significant Jewish community, whose roots date mostly to German Jewish immigrants of the mid-to-late 19th century. There were also Sephardic Jewish migrants from other areas of the South, and immigrants from other areas of Europe. The first Florida chapter of B'nai Brith was founded downtown in 1874, as well as the first temple, Beth-El, in 1876. Apart from the Reform Beth-El, Pensacola is also served by the Conservative B'nai Israel Synagogue.[47] Paula Ackerman, the first woman who performed rabbinical functions in the United States, was a Pensacola native and led services at Beth-El.
Of all the hotels in Pensacola, FL, on the beach, Days Inn Pensacola Beach will delight you most with spacious guest rooms tastefully decorated in warm, earth tones with light pastel accents. Each room opens to a balcony or deck. Whether you’re here on vacation or business, you’ll enjoy thoughtful amenities that show we understand what you need when you’re away from home.
Over $6 billion in damage occurred in the metro area and more than 10,000 homes were destroyed, with another 27,000 heavily damaged. NASA created a comparison image to illustrate the massive damage. Because of the widespread losses, Hurricane Ivan drove up the cost of housing in the area, leading to a severe shortage of affordable housing. In July 2005, Hurricane Dennis made landfall just east of the city, sparing it the damage received from Ivan the year before. However, hurricane and near-hurricane-force winds were recorded in downtown, causing moderate damage.
There is nothing that Pensacola can't do. Whether you are a golfer, shopaholic, outdoor enthusiast or an eternal romantic, there is something for everyone in Pensacola. To start with its beaches are a delight, especially the famous Johnson Beach. If you have kids, then the Pensacola Zoo would be the ideal spot, while for history lovers Fort Pickens acts as the main tourist draw.
The beach is stunning, and very relaxing on off-season. If you are up for visiting Pensacola, and are not wanting seafood every day for every meal, check out the Tin Cow in historic downtown Pensacola. It’s an awesome build your own burger place with amazing toppings and sauces, and they serve THE BEST spiked milkshakes! Perfect for trying the famous Bushwakers that Pensacola is known for!

Pensacola is the home of the Blue Angels, also known as the U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron. For a perfectly symmetrical showcase of stellar airplane acrobatics and aeronautical prowess, the Blue Angels give a show-stopping performance. Colorful streamers, twists, turns and flips through the air are all part and parcel of the air show extravaganza that the Blue Angels have become synonymous with.
In 1559, Don Tristan de Luna y Arellano led the first settlement of the region.[2] His 11 ships, with 1500 settlers,[2] anchored in the bay and established its colony on the site of today's Naval Air Station Pensacola. A hurricane decimated the colony a few weeks later, killing hundreds and sinking 5 ships.[2] Suffering long-term famine and fighting, this first settlement was finally abandoned in 1561.[2] A presidio was constructed on Santa Rosa Island in 1722 near the location of the more recent Fort Pickens. Hurricanes in 1741 and 1752[3] forced its relocation to the mainland.
The beach is stunning, and very relaxing on off-season. If you are up for visiting Pensacola, and are not wanting seafood every day for every meal, check out the Tin Cow in historic downtown Pensacola. It’s an awesome build your own burger place with amazing toppings and sauces, and they serve THE BEST spiked milkshakes! Perfect for trying the famous Bushwakers that Pensacola is known for!

Source: Clifford Grammich, Kirk Hadaway, Richard Houseal, Dale E.Jones, Alexei Krindatch, Richie Stanley and Richard H.Taylor. 2012. 2010 U.S.Religion Census: Religious Congregations & Membership Study. Association of Statisticians of American Religious Bodies. Jones, Dale E., et al. 2002. Congregations and Membership in the United States 2000. Nashville, TN: Glenmary Research Center. Graphs represent county-level data
The beach is stunning, and very relaxing on off-season. If you are up for visiting Pensacola, and are not wanting seafood every day for every meal, check out the Tin Cow in historic downtown Pensacola. It’s an awesome build your own burger place with amazing toppings and sauces, and they serve THE BEST spiked milkshakes! Perfect for trying the famous Bushwakers that Pensacola is known for!
Pensacola Beach is home to several "novelty houses", including the house "Dome of a Home", built in 2002 using a monolithic dome in the form of a large concrete dome, designed to structurally withstand hurricane-force winds at 133 m/s and storm surge. It withstood hurricane Ivan and Dennis. It is also known as the "Flintstone Home" due to the fact it resembles a rock home.[13]
Tensions between the white community and Indians tended to increase during the Removal era. In addition, an increasing proportion of Anglo-Americans, who constituted the majority of whites by 1840, led to a hardening of racial discrimination in the area.[14] There was disapproval of white men living with women of color, which had previously been accepted. In 1853 the legislature passed a bill prohibiting Indians from living in the state, and provided for capture and removal to Indian Territory.[14]
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