While generally cooler than most of peninsular Florida, Pensacola Beach maintains a more stable temperature year round than inland areas of Pensacola and Escambia County. As such, winter lows are several degrees warmer than Pensacola proper and summer highs are generally cooler as a result of the surrounding waters. As with many islands, Pensacola Beach enjoys sea breezes which begin around noon and end around sunset in the summer. The average temperature ranges from forty-eight degrees Fahrenheit in January to eighty-nine degrees in July.[5]
Pensacola Beach for many years remained largely undeveloped. The Casino Resort was the first tourist destination constructed on the island (at the present day location of Casino Beach) where a variety of special events including beauty pageants, fishing tournaments and boxing matches were held from the 30s through 50s. With a bar, tennis courts, bath houses, and a restaurant, it was a popular resort until it eventually closed in the 1960s.

Downtown 15Palafox Street 15Palafox Street Website: https://downtownpensacola.com/ 850-434-5371 didn’t used to be anywhere you would want to wander, locals tell me. But this central avenue began to thrive during the past decade, with new restaurants and bars moving in. Some of the resurgence was due to the infusion of cash the community received as a result of the oil spill, says Rennie, the jeweler, of Blue Morning Gallery. Palafox offers a lovely stretch for window-shopping, a long walk or serious buying: It’s lined with appealing eateries, specialty shops and boutiques, with a weekend farmers market at the north end and the bay at the south. The third Friday of every month is Gallery Night, when food trucks and live bands set up, and shops stay open until 11 p.m. Early in the morning, you might walk all the way down Palafox to the pier, watch people fishing, then grab a coffee at the two-story Bodacious Brew. For $3.50, they’ll put all the major food groups into a bowl of Bodacious Grits: Gouda cheese, green onion, roasted corn, olive oil and heavy cream. And blanketed under it all, grits elevated to an art form.


The white sand was so fluffy! It was so clean and didn't burn our feet. The water was beautiful and it was the perfect temperature. There weren't a whole lot of waves to jump, but it was still fun and relaxing. The Blue Angels practice on Tuesdays and Wednesdays depending upon their schedule and the weather. I highly recommend making time for this privilege!
Pensacola Beach is home to several "novelty houses", including the house "Dome of a Home", built in 2002 using a monolithic dome in the form of a large concrete dome, designed to structurally withstand hurricane-force winds at 133 m/s and storm surge. It withstood hurricane Ivan and Dennis. It is also known as the "Flintstone Home" due to the fact it resembles a rock home.[13]
Of all the hotels in Pensacola, FL, on the beach, Days Inn Pensacola Beach will delight you most with spacious guest rooms tastefully decorated in warm, earth tones with light pastel accents. Each room opens to a balcony or deck. Whether you’re here on vacation or business, you’ll enjoy thoughtful amenities that show we understand what you need when you’re away from home.
After getting settled at your accommodation of choice, you'll likely want to venture out and explore. If you can't wait to check out the beaches, head to Gulf Islands National Seashore or Bayview Beach Park for a relaxing day by the water. Experience the area's live music and biking trails, and make time for local attractions like Portofino Boardwalk and Pensacola Beach Pier. For more things to see and do, consider visiting Fort Pickens or Santa Rosa Island.
Weather statistics since the late 20th century have been recorded at the airport. The city has seen single digit temperatures (below −12 °C) on three occasions: 5 °F (−15 °C) on January 21, 1985, 7 °F (−14 °C) on February 13, 1899 and 8 °F (−13 °C) on January 11, 1982.[31] According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Pensacola has a humid subtropical climate,[32] (Köppen Cfa), with short, mild winters and hot, humid summers. Typical summer conditions have highs in the lower 90s °F (32–34 °C) and lows in the mid 70s °F (23–24 °C).[33] Afternoon or evening thunderstorms are common during the summer months. Due partly to the coastal location, temperatures above 100 °F (38 °C) are relatively rare, and last occurred in June 2011, when two of the first four days of the month recorded highs reaching the century mark.[34] The highest temperature ever recorded in the city was 106 °F (41 °C) on July 14, 1980.[33] The daily average temperature in January is 51.4 °F (10.8 °C); freezing temperatures occur on an average 13.7 nights per season, with the average window for freezing conditions being from December 13 to February 20.[35] Temperatures below 20 °F (−7 °C) are very rare, and last occurred on January 8, 2015,[36] when a low of 19 °F (−7 °C) was seen.[37] The lowest temperature ever recorded in the city was 5 °F (−15 °C) on January 21, 1985.[33]

The petite, charming Quina House, built in 1820 or earlier, is the oldest house in Pensacola that’s still in its original location, now the heart of the 16Historic District 16Historic District Google Map: 204 S. Alcaniz St. Website: https://pensacolahistoricpreservationsociety.com/quinahouse 850-432-3050 . “It has 1820s air conditioning,” says Ed Muller, docent for the house, “a front door, back door and 12-foot ceilings.” Muller is a treasure trove of history; he will tell you how the Spanish landed in what is now Pensacola Bay six years before they established St. Augustine, on Florida’s Atlantic coast, which lays claim to being the nation’s oldest — but not first — city. That colony was the first to survive beyond a few weeks — in fact, it lasted about two years. Soon after the colonists arrived, a hurricane sank most of their ships and wiped out their provisions, including livestock. (Muller says it’s his belief that most of the settlers died because they didn’t eat oysters.) Eventually even the survivors who had hung on to the shrinking settlement vacated. Over the centuries, the French and Spanish tussled over the region. You can pick up some of those influences in the cottages of this pleasant district. Muller lives two blocks from the Quina House; he moved to Pensacola from New Jersey and says he’ll never leave. “Everyone comes to visit me,” he says, “and I don’t have to go anywhere for vacation.”
The original inhabitants of the Pensacola Bay area were Native American peoples. At the time of European contact, a Muskogean-speaking tribe known to the Spanish as the Pensacola lived in the region. This name was not recorded until 1677, but the tribe appears to be the source of the name "Pensacola" for the bay and thence the city.[13] Creek people, also Muskogean-speaking, came regularly from present-day southern Alabama to trade, so the peoples were part of a broader regional and even continental network of relations.[14]
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