We’re not the only ones. Pensacola has become a magnet for young people drawn to the burgeoning business scene and affordable living. The city is responding with new construction. But you won’t find massive development here — yet. Some locals worry it may come to that. This seems to be a magical in-between time. For a once-sleepy Southern town, it feels like an awakening.

^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h Jane E. Dysart, "Another Road to Disappearance: Assimilation of Creek Indians in Pensacola, Florida during the Nineteenth Century", The Florida Historical Quarterly, Vol. 61, No. 1 (July 1982), pp. 37–48, Published by: Florida Historical Society, Article Stable URL: https://www.jstor.org/stable/30146156, accessed 26 June 2014
Pensacola vacations are the perfect opportunity to stretch your wings and seek wisdom in a new place. Each town, city, or region you visit has its own lore, and Pensacola is no different. Take a leisurely stroll back in time at the Historic Pensacola Village where you can tour over 20 properties and self-guided museums. Enjoy a pristine strip of sandy serenity at the Fort Pickens Gulf Islands National Seashore—you won’t find a better place to count the clouds as they float across the vast Florida sky. Speaking of the sky, be sure to visit the National Naval Aviation Museum where you can see more than 4,000 artifacts and observe over 150 restored aircraft. You might even catch a glimpse of the world-famous Blue Angels.

As was the case in most of Florida, the Democratic primary was the real contest for most state and local elections until the 1970s. However, from the 1960s onward, due in part to the Republican Party's Southern strategy, residents of this staunchly conservative military and Bible Belt city began splitting their tickets and voting Republican in national elections. Despite this, Democrats continued to win most elections at the state and local level well into the 1990s, though most of them were very conservative even by Southern Democratic standards.
Pensacola is home to a small (0.2% of city residents)[46] but significant Jewish community, whose roots date mostly to German Jewish immigrants of the mid-to-late 19th century. There were also Sephardic Jewish migrants from other areas of the South, and immigrants from other areas of Europe. The first Florida chapter of B'nai Brith was founded downtown in 1874, as well as the first temple, Beth-El, in 1876. Apart from the Reform Beth-El, Pensacola is also served by the Conservative B'nai Israel Synagogue.[47] Paula Ackerman, the first woman who performed rabbinical functions in the United States, was a Pensacola native and led services at Beth-El.
Larry Cowan likes to quote an old Southern saying, used to calm people down: “Don’t worry, it’s going to come together like goat lips.” He says it so often that when he opened his deli turned beer garden, friends dared him to call it Goat Lips. He did. He regretted it at first: “It’s just not appetizing. But it’s turned out to be an asset. It’s memorable.” Thus was 5Goat Lips Chew & Brewhouse 5Goat Lips Chew and Brewhouse Google Map: 2811 Copter Rd. Website: http://www.goatlips.com/ 850-474-1919 born. It houses a small “nanobrewery,” which turns out a half-dozen or so beers on tap. The most unusual — and my favorite — is the jalapeño cream ale. Most breweries don’t offer food, but Goat Lips has a full menu, featuring giant muffuletta sandwiches — a half fills a plate and rises, oh, four to six inches on a base of Gambino’s bread delivered from New Orleans, with layers of mortadella, salami, provolone cheese and olive relish. Then it’s baked, so the edges of the meat get crispy. The shrimp Creole is peppery and rich; the menu also features comfort-food staples, meatloaf, pot roast. Goat Lips has a mellow, casual vibe. Cowan likes bonfires and makes them big enough to withstand even a light rain. The covered back deck is a popular spot for live bands and a weekly Trivia Night — which my husband and I stumbled upon and were immediately swept up in. Out back there’s a statue of a goat carved out of cypress wood, elevated on a little platform. Says Cowan with a laugh, “I’m afraid it’s going to be my tombstone one day.”
Weather statistics since the late 20th century have been recorded at the airport. The city has seen single digit temperatures (below −12 °C) on three occasions: 5 °F (−15 °C) on January 21, 1985, 7 °F (−14 °C) on February 13, 1899 and 8 °F (−13 °C) on January 11, 1982.[31] According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Pensacola has a humid subtropical climate,[32] (Köppen Cfa), with short, mild winters and hot, humid summers. Typical summer conditions have highs in the lower 90s °F (32–34 °C) and lows in the mid 70s °F (23–24 °C).[33] Afternoon or evening thunderstorms are common during the summer months. Due partly to the coastal location, temperatures above 100 °F (38 °C) are relatively rare, and last occurred in June 2011, when two of the first four days of the month recorded highs reaching the century mark.[34] The highest temperature ever recorded in the city was 106 °F (41 °C) on July 14, 1980.[33] The daily average temperature in January is 51.4 °F (10.8 °C); freezing temperatures occur on an average 13.7 nights per season, with the average window for freezing conditions being from December 13 to February 20.[35] Temperatures below 20 °F (−7 °C) are very rare, and last occurred on January 8, 2015,[36] when a low of 19 °F (−7 °C) was seen.[37] The lowest temperature ever recorded in the city was 5 °F (−15 °C) on January 21, 1985.[33]
Bayview Park offers a great place for a family day of fun in the sun. There is also a boat launch spot, which only adds to the many features that this impressive park has on offer. Whether you find yourself enjoying the gazebo, the expanse of lawn, or minding your children as they play in the playground, you’re sure to have a great day when you spend it the Bayview way.
Seafood restaurants crowd the waterfront, but the bustling Joe Patti’s Seafood market stands apart, under a towering neon shrimp sign. Enter by the beignet wagon, and you’ll find an enormous fish market, which is worth a visit just to gape at the sea-dwelling varieties and their sizes. The humble restaurant next door is 8Captain Joey Patti’s Seafood Restaurant. 8Captain Joey Patti's Seafood Restaurant Google Map: 610 S. C St. Website: http://captainjoeysdeli.com/ 850-434-3193 odd hours/days This low-ceilinged blue bunker has no view of the water. It has no atmosphere. Ceiling fans whirl overhead. You eat over paper place mats with plastic utensils. Start with the thick, fiery seafood gumbo but leave room for heaping platters of fried fish. Mullet — you might know it elsewhere as a bait fish — is a rich-flavored specialty. “Did y’all get coleslaw?” our server asks, sliding crisp, sweet bowls of it across the table. Everything here is fresh. Stick a fork in the fried oysters, and juice jumps out; the oysters melt in your mouth. Did the cheese grits descend from heaven? Maybe so; they are that luscious. My physiological limits vexingly got in the way of what I wanted to do here: eat it all and then some.
Downtown 15Palafox Street 15Palafox Street Website: https://downtownpensacola.com/ 850-434-5371 didn’t used to be anywhere you would want to wander, locals tell me. But this central avenue began to thrive during the past decade, with new restaurants and bars moving in. Some of the resurgence was due to the infusion of cash the community received as a result of the oil spill, says Rennie, the jeweler, of Blue Morning Gallery. Palafox offers a lovely stretch for window-shopping, a long walk or serious buying: It’s lined with appealing eateries, specialty shops and boutiques, with a weekend farmers market at the north end and the bay at the south. The third Friday of every month is Gallery Night, when food trucks and live bands set up, and shops stay open until 11 p.m. Early in the morning, you might walk all the way down Palafox to the pier, watch people fishing, then grab a coffee at the two-story Bodacious Brew. For $3.50, they’ll put all the major food groups into a bowl of Bodacious Grits: Gouda cheese, green onion, roasted corn, olive oil and heavy cream. And blanketed under it all, grits elevated to an art form.
Pensacola Beach is zoned (assigned to) a different ECSD elementary school, Suter Elementary School,[17] as well as Workman Middle School,[18] and Pensacola High School.[19] However most students in Pensacola Beach attend Santa Rosa County School District schools in Gulf Breeze for middle and high school grades:[15] they would include Gulf Breeze Middle School and Gulf Breeze High School. In addition, some attend Pensacola-area magnet schools.[20]

The event calendar in Pensacola is full of fun festivals, signature shows, and sensational celebrations. The FooFoo Festival is as unique as any local fete we have ever found. The diverse combination of art, culture, and cuisine features everything from open-air opera to a Big Green Egg cooking competition. The Summer Music Series fills the sunset-sky with the sounds of free live-music at this weekly outdoor concert. As the summer winds down, the flavors heat up at the Pensacola Seafood Festival where 100,000 of your closest friends come together for three days to celebrate the bounties of the Gulf. Finally, the city’s premier event—the Blue Angel Homecoming Show—celebrates the area’s Naval aviation history every November with the Blue Angels performing their aerial acrobatics for all to see.


Pensacola is nicknamed "The City of Five Flags" due to the five governments that have flown flags over it during its history: the flags of Spain (Castile), France, Great Britain, the Confederate States of America, and the United States. Other nicknames include "World's Whitest Beaches" (due to the white sand prevalent along beaches in the Florida panhandle), "Cradle of Naval Aviation", "Western Gate to the Sunshine State", "America's First Settlement", "Emerald Coast", "Redneck Riviera", "Red Snapper Capital of the World", and "P-Cola"
While the bill excluded half-bloods and Indians already living in white communities, they went "underground" to escape persecution. No Indians were listed in late 19th and early 20th century censuses for Escambia County. People of Indian descent were forced into the white or black communities by appearance, and officially, in terms of records, "disappeared". It was a pattern repeated in many Southern settlements. Children of white fathers and Indian mothers were not designated as Indian in the late 19th century, whereas children of blacks or mulattos were classified within the black community, related to laws during the slavery years.[14]

The National Naval Aviation Museum, one of the largest aviation museums in the world, has approximately 150 aircraft on display aboard Naval Air Station Pensacola. NAS Pensacola is also the home of the U.S. Navy’s flight demonstration squadron, and visitors are welcome to watch the team’s aerial acrobatics at practice air shows on select dates March through November.
I ran into this mix of peaceful intimacy and full-on partying throughout my stay in Pensacola. My husband and I came here for our niece’s wedding and quickly succumbed to its eclecticism. Nestled on the western edge of the Florida Panhandle, Pensacola has a small-town feel. This is “Deep South” Florida, not spring-break-college-destination Florida. It’s a slower-paced alternative to a typical Florida winter retreat, with the overt friendliness of folks who like to live it up and want to share the fun. (Day drinkers, here’s your haven — some happy hours start at 11 a.m. or even earlier). Cheese grits are always an option.
The best-known Pensacola culture site in terms of archeology is the Bottle Creek site, a large site located 59 miles (95 km) west of Pensacola north of Mobile, Alabama. This site has at least 18 large earthwork mounds, five of which are arranged around a central plaza. Its main occupation was from 1250 AD to 1550. It was a ceremonial center for the Pensacola people and a gateway to their society. This site would have had easy access by a dugout canoe, the main mode of transportation used by the Pensacola.[15]
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