The event calendar in Pensacola is full of fun festivals, signature shows, and sensational celebrations. The FooFoo Festival is as unique as any local fete we have ever found. The diverse combination of art, culture, and cuisine features everything from open-air opera to a Big Green Egg cooking competition. The Summer Music Series fills the sunset-sky with the sounds of free live-music at this weekly outdoor concert. As the summer winds down, the flavors heat up at the Pensacola Seafood Festival where 100,000 of your closest friends come together for three days to celebrate the bounties of the Gulf. Finally, the city’s premier event—the Blue Angel Homecoming Show—celebrates the area’s Naval aviation history every November with the Blue Angels performing their aerial acrobatics for all to see.
Welcome to our Hilton Pensacola Beach hotel overlooking the stunning emerald waters of the Gulf of Mexico. Discover a variety of water sports, fantastic shopping and vibrant nightlife within walking distance of our Pensacola Beach hotel. From family vacations and romantic getaways to business trip, our hotel has the amenities you need to plan a great trip.
Weather statistics since the late 20th century have been recorded at the airport. The city has seen single digit temperatures (below −12 °C) on three occasions: 5 °F (−15 °C) on January 21, 1985, 7 °F (−14 °C) on February 13, 1899 and 8 °F (−13 °C) on January 11, 1982.[31] According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Pensacola has a humid subtropical climate,[32] (Köppen Cfa), with short, mild winters and hot, humid summers. Typical summer conditions have highs in the lower 90s °F (32–34 °C) and lows in the mid 70s °F (23–24 °C).[33] Afternoon or evening thunderstorms are common during the summer months. Due partly to the coastal location, temperatures above 100 °F (38 °C) are relatively rare, and last occurred in June 2011, when two of the first four days of the month recorded highs reaching the century mark.[34] The highest temperature ever recorded in the city was 106 °F (41 °C) on July 14, 1980.[33] The daily average temperature in January is 51.4 °F (10.8 °C); freezing temperatures occur on an average 13.7 nights per season, with the average window for freezing conditions being from December 13 to February 20.[35] Temperatures below 20 °F (−7 °C) are very rare, and last occurred on January 8, 2015,[36] when a low of 19 °F (−7 °C) was seen.[37] The lowest temperature ever recorded in the city was 5 °F (−15 °C) on January 21, 1985.[33]
Explore the history and charm of one of the oldest settlements in the South while staying at the beach in our Pensacola Beach vacation rentals.  Choose from a variety of beach front and beach access condos, resorts and vacation homes, some offering a simple beach vacation while others boast an abundance of amenities and activities directly on-site. That’s just how Pensacola Beach is ~ an eclectic mix appealing to every type traveler.
After years of settlement, the Spanish ceded Florida to the British in 1763 as a result of an exchange following British victory over both France and Spain in the French and Indian War (the North American theater of the Seven Years' War), and French cession of its territories in North America. The British designated Pensacola as the capital of their new colony of West Florida. From 1763, the British strengthened defenses around the mainland area of fort San Carlos de Barrancas, building the Royal Navy Redoubt. George Johnstone was appointed as the first British Governor, and in 1764 a colonial assembly was established.[24][25] The structure of the colony was modeled after the existing British colonies in America, as opposed to Quebec, which was based on a different structure. West Florida was invited to send delegates to the First Continental Congress which was convened to present colonial grievances against the British Parliament to George III, but along with several other colonies, including East Florida, they declined the invitation. Once the American War of Independence had broken out, the colonists remained overwhelmingly loyal to the Crown. In 1778 the Willing Expedition proceeded with a small force down the Mississippi, ransacking estates and plantations, until they were eventually defeated by a local militia. In the wake of this, the area received a small number of British reinforcements.
The resurgence of Pensacola’s downtown in the past few years means several old factories and warehouses near the bay got spruced up and repurposed. One of these was a former box factory, which has been converted into the 14New World Inn. 14New World Inn Google Map: 600 S. Palafox St. Website: https://skopelosatnewworld.com/stay/about-new-world/ 850-432-4111 It also houses Skopelos, a gourmet restaurant. Each room in this upscale hotel is decorated differently and named for a figure from Pensacola’s rich history. The most popular, according to manager Amanda Kirk-Pennington, is the Rachel and Andrew Jackson suite, a favorite of newlyweds, with its California king bed, antique writing desk and separate lounge area. Other rooms — especially those on the second floor — look out onto the waterfront, such as the Vicente Sebastián Pintado, named for a Spanish surveyor who in the early 1800s drew up the plan for Pensacola’s streets. But, um, beware: “We do have a reputation for being haunted,” Kirk-Pennington says. “You’ll hear doors opening or doorknobs that’ll shake. We recently had a guest call down and say things were shaking in his room. But it’s all very benign,” she assures me. “The building is 120 years old, so it stands to reason it would have some quirks.” 
Snow is rare in Pensacola, but does occasionally fall. The most recent snowfall event occurred December 9, 2017,[38] and the snow event previous to it occurred on February 12, 2010.[39] The city receives 65.27 inches (1,660 mm) of precipitation per year, with a slightly more rainy season in the summer. The rainiest month is July, with 7.40 inches (188 mm), with May being the driest month at 4.17 inches (106 mm).[33] In June 2012 over one foot (300 mm) of rain fell on Pensacola and adjacent areas, leading to widespread flooding.[40] On April 29, 2014. Pensacola was drenched by at least 20 inches of rain within a 24-hour period, causing the worst flooding in 30 years[41]

Generations of families have been coming to our beach to reconnect and have fun.  With downtown Pensacola so close, business travelers and groups like to stay at the Beach even when conducting business “in town.” Everyone enjoys the white sand beach and emerald waters of the Gulf. Everyone also gets to enjoy the flyovers by the world renowned Blue Angels, based right here in Pensacola. The presence of our Navy also provides the memorable opportunity to visit the Naval Air Museum.
Downtown 15Palafox Street 15Palafox Street Website: https://downtownpensacola.com/ 850-434-5371 didn’t used to be anywhere you would want to wander, locals tell me. But this central avenue began to thrive during the past decade, with new restaurants and bars moving in. Some of the resurgence was due to the infusion of cash the community received as a result of the oil spill, says Rennie, the jeweler, of Blue Morning Gallery. Palafox offers a lovely stretch for window-shopping, a long walk or serious buying: It’s lined with appealing eateries, specialty shops and boutiques, with a weekend farmers market at the north end and the bay at the south. The third Friday of every month is Gallery Night, when food trucks and live bands set up, and shops stay open until 11 p.m. Early in the morning, you might walk all the way down Palafox to the pier, watch people fishing, then grab a coffee at the two-story Bodacious Brew. For $3.50, they’ll put all the major food groups into a bowl of Bodacious Grits: Gouda cheese, green onion, roasted corn, olive oil and heavy cream. And blanketed under it all, grits elevated to an art form.
In 1559, Tristán de Luna y Arellano landed with some 1,500 people on 11 ships from Veracruz, Mexico.[18][16][19][20] The expedition was to establish an outpost, ultimately called Santa María de Ochuse by Luna, as a base for Spanish efforts to colonize Santa Elena (present-day Parris Island, South Carolina.) But the colony was decimated by a hurricane on September 19, 1559,[18][16][20] which killed an unknown number of sailors and colonists, sank six ships, grounded a seventh, and ruined supplies.
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