Pensacola is the westernmost city in the Florida Panhandle and the county seat of Escambia County, Florida, United States of America. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 56,255 and as of 2009, the estimated population was 53,752. Pensacola is the principal city of the Pensacola – Ferry Pass – Brent Metropolitan Statistical Area, an area with about 455,102 residents in 2009.
A trip to Pensacola would be incomplete without a venture downtown on a Saturday morning (9.00am to 2.00pm) to Palafox Market. Do yourself a huge favour and make this particular experience a ‘must-do’, during your travels in P-cola. What began as a modest 5-month seasonal market, with 25 vendors, has grown exponentially to where it now open all year round, boasting over 85 weekly vendors.
During the early years of settlement, a tri-racial creole society developed. As a fortified trading post, the Spanish had mostly men stationed here. Some married or had unions with Pensacola, Creek or African women, both slave and free, and their descendants created a mixed-race population of mestizos and mulattos. The Spanish encouraged slaves from the southern British colonies to come to Florida as a refuge, promising freedom in exchange for conversion to Catholicism. King Charles II of Spain issued a royal proclamation freeing all slaves who fled to Spanish Florida and accepted conversion and baptism. Most went to the area around St. Augustine, but escaped slaves also reached Pensacola. St. Augustine had mustered an all-black militia unit defending Spain as early as 1683.[23]

D.R. Horton is America's largest new home builder by volume. Since 1978, D.R. Horton has consistently delivered top-quality new homes to homebuyers across the nation. Our livable floor plans, energy efficient features and robust new home warranty demonstrate our commitment to excellence in construction. D.R. Horton new homes are built with unmatched efficiencies-all based on a philosophy from our founder, Donald R. Horton, of creating value every step of the way.


Hilton Pensacola Beach – Contemporary, upscale, and luxurious, the Hilton Pensacola Beach offers every amenity you may need to create a memorable Gulf Coast experience. Start the day off with a cup of coffee from your private gulf-front balcony, then stroll along the shoreline before spending some time with a novel on a pool-side lounge chair. Enjoy an adventurous meal at the Bonsai Sushi Bar, then hit the town for an evening in one of the U.S.’s top-5 beach cities.
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Pensacola loves its Blue Angels; you’ll find pictures of the blue-and-gold aircraft painted on local bridges. Head west of the city to visit their home base, Naval Air Station Pensacola, where practices start up again in March. The base also hosts the 4National Naval Aviation Museum, 4National Naval Aviation Museum Google Map: 1750 Radford Blvd., Naval Air Station Pensacola Website: http://www.navalaviationmuseum.org/ 850-452-3604 or 850-452-3606 open year-round. It’s the world’s largest, and you can easily spend half a day or more among its minutely detailed aircraft carrier models and restored aircraft, including the World War II Corsair, nicknamed “Whistling Death,” with its unique inverted gull wing, and the Que Sera Sera, the first aircraft to land at the South Pole. “Home Front U.S.A.,” an exhibit of small-town life in 1943, re-creates a street lined with wartime grocery and barber shops, full of vintage treasures. At the museum’s heart is a 10,000-square-foot atrium, where four historic Blue Angels aircraft hang overhead in perfect formation. Admission is free. 

It could be a comedy, tragedy or musical, time at Saenger Theatre is a great way to while away a few hours. Need some more options? Veterans Memorial Park is a remarkable structure that stands as a reminder of past events. But that's not all! Does it leave you with an impression? What was the artist trying to achieve? Ask yourself these and other questions as you walk the corridors of Pensacola Museum of Art, a well-liked art institution.
The beach and water were beautiful and the water felt wonderful. The one convenient store we saw was very busy, hard to get in and out of the parking lot with all the traffic. It was easy to get around otherwise. We visited the fort and enjoyed that historic excursion. Not able to see much because we were there for a short time and busy with attending wedding activities, so not really a great review. Although, I wouldn’t mind going back for a longer stay.
While the bill excluded half-bloods and Indians already living in white communities, they went "underground" to escape persecution. No Indians were listed in late 19th and early 20th century censuses for Escambia County. People of Indian descent were forced into the white or black communities by appearance, and officially, in terms of records, "disappeared". It was a pattern repeated in many Southern settlements. Children of white fathers and Indian mothers were not designated as Indian in the late 19th century, whereas children of blacks or mulattos were classified within the black community, related to laws during the slavery years.[14]
From early 1993 through August 2005 Pensacola was served by the tri-weekly Amtrak Sunset Limited, but service east of New Orleans to Jacksonville and Orlando was suspended due to damage to the rail line of CSX during Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Attempts are being made to have service restored. This was previously the route of the Gulf Wind operated by the Louisville and Nashville Railroad.[57][58]
The hub of beach activity, Casino Beach, on Pensacola Beach, is named after the original casino that stood in this location and is a popular beach access.[9] The location is dotted with restaurants and family entertainment areas.[10] It is situated next to the Pensacola Beach Gulf Pier and is equipped with lifeguard stands and station, volleyball courts, snack bar and large parking lot. The Gulfside Pavilion hosts a "Bands on the Beach" concert series during the summer tourist season.[11]

Never one to miss a beat, always jam-packed with fun times and laughter, this lovely lady, Pensacola, is a welcoming and gracious host. Expect to enjoy your vacation along the western expanse of the Florida panhandle, namely, Pensacola, as this is one coastline town that knows just how to treat its guests, giving them a good ol’ southern welcome, always. It’s easy to live your best life, when down south in Pensacola.

Never one to miss a beat, always jam-packed with fun times and laughter, this lovely lady, Pensacola, is a welcoming and gracious host. Expect to enjoy your vacation along the western expanse of the Florida panhandle, namely, Pensacola, as this is one coastline town that knows just how to treat its guests, giving them a good ol’ southern welcome, always. It’s easy to live your best life, when down south in Pensacola.

The Deepwater Horizon, a BP-operated oil-drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico off the Louisiana coast, exploded April 20, 2010, eventually releasing almost 5 million barrels of oil into the Gulf before being capped on August 4, 2010. Oil from the explosion did not reach Pensacola Beaches until June 4, 2010. Crews posted along Escambia County’s coastline quickly cleaned much of the oil that was evident along the beaches. Tourism in the Pensacola Beach area was adversely affected during the summer of 2010.
The survivors struggled to survive, most moving inland to what is now central Alabama for several months in 1560 before returning to the coast; but in 1561, the effort was abandoned.[18][20] Some of the survivors eventually sailed to Santa Elena, but another storm struck there. Survivors made their way to Cuba and finally returned to Pensacola, where the remaining fifty at Pensacola were taken back to Veracruz. The Viceroy's advisers later concluded that northwest Florida was too dangerous to settle. They ignored it for 137 years.[18][20]
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