You’ve just discovered one of the most popular hotels in Pensacola Beach, FL. Our beautiful hotel is just a few footprints in the sand away from warm Gulf of Mexico waters and cool sea breezes on the spectacular barrier island of Pensacola Beach. Even though we are situated right on the beach, it’s very easy to get here from Interstate 10 and the Pensacola Gulf Coast Regional Airport.
“You turn the lights on, and they come every which way, like roaches,” says Renee Mack, speaking with crusty affection of her customers at 6Paradise Bar & Grill 6Paradise Bar and Grill Google Map: 21 Via De Luna Website: http://www.paradisebar-grill.com/ 850-916-5087 . “They come by boat, by foot, by golf cart, by Jet Ski.” Paradise is an authentic little hideaway on the bay side of Pensacola Beach, a restaurant, bar and vintage motel. You can swim up if you like. Bring a wet dog. Hang up your own hammock or lounge at one of the picnic tables under an umbrella. Paradise has an old-Florida feel. There’s no view of the high-rises, just a good look at that gentle bay surf. Evenings, locals gather to hear a live band and dance in the sand of the private beach. Mack moved to Pensacola in 1984 from New Orleans and brought some Big Easy traditions with her, such as a penchant for the blues and oyster po’ boys, featured on the menu. Her biggest seller is Renee’s Shrimp Salad, from her grandmother’s recipe, made with fresh, wild-caught Gulf shrimp. It’s kicky Cajun flavor comes from fresh herbs. The special sauce in her bushwackers? “We put in a lot of liquor — a lot of rum. And real soft-serve ice cream — none of that powdered stuff.” Mack, as you might gather, likes to keep things simple. Bad weather gets a shrug. “We roll,” she says. “We don’t close down.”
The location of the property was amazing. Covered parking was available. Even though we were at the front of the villas we were able to walk to the beach every day. We were also close enough to the attractions at Pensacola beach that it was a very short drive. The neighbors in the same condo we were in were very friendly and polite. Brittany the property manager Was very easy to get in touch with and very helpful.
Notable locations in Pensacola: Belvedere Park Plaza (A), Town 'N Country Plaza (B), Muscogee Wharf (C), Pensacola Port Authority (D), Dr Vernon McDaniel Administration Building (E), Select Specialty Hospital (F), Lifeguard Air Ambulance (G), Pensacola Fire Department Station 7 (H), Pensacola Fire Department Station 2 (I), Pensacola Fire Department Station 6 (J), Pensacola Fire Department Station 3 (K), Pensacola Fire Department Station 4 (L), Pensacola Fire Department Station 1 (M). Display/hide their locations on the map
The petite, charming Quina House, built in 1820 or earlier, is the oldest house in Pensacola that’s still in its original location, now the heart of the 16Historic District 16Historic District Google Map: 204 S. Alcaniz St. Website: https://pensacolahistoricpreservationsociety.com/quinahouse 850-432-3050 . “It has 1820s air conditioning,” says Ed Muller, docent for the house, “a front door, back door and 12-foot ceilings.” Muller is a treasure trove of history; he will tell you how the Spanish landed in what is now Pensacola Bay six years before they established St. Augustine, on Florida’s Atlantic coast, which lays claim to being the nation’s oldest — but not first — city. That colony was the first to survive beyond a few weeks — in fact, it lasted about two years. Soon after the colonists arrived, a hurricane sank most of their ships and wiped out their provisions, including livestock. (Muller says it’s his belief that most of the settlers died because they didn’t eat oysters.) Eventually even the survivors who had hung on to the shrinking settlement vacated. Over the centuries, the French and Spanish tussled over the region. You can pick up some of those influences in the cottages of this pleasant district. Muller lives two blocks from the Quina House; he moved to Pensacola from New Jersey and says he’ll never leave. “Everyone comes to visit me,” he says, “and I don’t have to go anywhere for vacation.”
The hub of beach activity, Casino Beach, on Pensacola Beach, is named after the original casino that stood in this location and is a popular beach access.[9] The location is dotted with restaurants and family entertainment areas.[10] It is situated next to the Pensacola Beach Gulf Pier and is equipped with lifeguard stands and station, volleyball courts, snack bar and large parking lot. The Gulfside Pavilion hosts a "Bands on the Beach" concert series during the summer tourist season.[11]

Pensacola loves its Blue Angels; you’ll find pictures of the blue-and-gold aircraft painted on local bridges. Head west of the city to visit their home base, Naval Air Station Pensacola, where practices start up again in March. The base also hosts the 4National Naval Aviation Museum, 4National Naval Aviation Museum Google Map: 1750 Radford Blvd., Naval Air Station Pensacola Website: http://www.navalaviationmuseum.org/ 850-452-3604 or 850-452-3606 open year-round. It’s the world’s largest, and you can easily spend half a day or more among its minutely detailed aircraft carrier models and restored aircraft, including the World War II Corsair, nicknamed “Whistling Death,” with its unique inverted gull wing, and the Que Sera Sera, the first aircraft to land at the South Pole. “Home Front U.S.A.,” an exhibit of small-town life in 1943, re-creates a street lined with wartime grocery and barber shops, full of vintage treasures. At the museum’s heart is a 10,000-square-foot atrium, where four historic Blue Angels aircraft hang overhead in perfect formation. Admission is free. 


The resurgence of Pensacola’s downtown in the past few years means several old factories and warehouses near the bay got spruced up and repurposed. One of these was a former box factory, which has been converted into the 14New World Inn. 14New World Inn Google Map: 600 S. Palafox St. Website: https://skopelosatnewworld.com/stay/about-new-world/ 850-432-4111 It also houses Skopelos, a gourmet restaurant. Each room in this upscale hotel is decorated differently and named for a figure from Pensacola’s rich history. The most popular, according to manager Amanda Kirk-Pennington, is the Rachel and Andrew Jackson suite, a favorite of newlyweds, with its California king bed, antique writing desk and separate lounge area. Other rooms — especially those on the second floor — look out onto the waterfront, such as the Vicente Sebastián Pintado, named for a Spanish surveyor who in the early 1800s drew up the plan for Pensacola’s streets. But, um, beware: “We do have a reputation for being haunted,” Kirk-Pennington says. “You’ll hear doors opening or doorknobs that’ll shake. We recently had a guest call down and say things were shaking in his room. But it’s all very benign,” she assures me. “The building is 120 years old, so it stands to reason it would have some quirks.” 

Utah Vacation RentalsVacation Rentals in Columbia, Maury CountyLake Whatcom Vacation RentalsVacation Rentals close to Sunday River Ski ResortBig Canoe House RentalsCape May Point Vacation RentalsEllensburg Vacation RentalsRocky Mount Vacation Home DestinationsNew Haven Vacation RentalsHome Rentals in GladstoneVacation Rentals in Newport, Penobscot CountyUvalde Vacation RentalsBend Vacation RentalsBrunswick Vacation RentalsEdgartown House RentalsRent at Lake Buena Vista Resort, Orange CountyGlen Arbor Vacation Rentals

I ran into this mix of peaceful intimacy and full-on partying throughout my stay in Pensacola. My husband and I came here for our niece’s wedding and quickly succumbed to its eclecticism. Nestled on the western edge of the Florida Panhandle, Pensacola has a small-town feel. This is “Deep South” Florida, not spring-break-college-destination Florida. It’s a slower-paced alternative to a typical Florida winter retreat, with the overt friendliness of folks who like to live it up and want to share the fun. (Day drinkers, here’s your haven — some happy hours start at 11 a.m. or even earlier). Cheese grits are always an option.
Explore the famous Lighthouse and Museum of Pensacola, and experience vistas of Pensacola Beach unparalleled and unrivalled by any other vantage point. Climb the 177 steps to the top of the lighthouse and check out the impressive view of the Pensacola Pass (the point where Pensacola meets the Gulf of Mexico). Built in 1859, the lighthouse has been part of the Pensacola skyline for hundreds of years.
Weather statistics since the late 20th century have been recorded at the airport. The city has seen single digit temperatures (below −12 °C) on three occasions: 5 °F (−15 °C) on January 21, 1985, 7 °F (−14 °C) on February 13, 1899 and 8 °F (−13 °C) on January 11, 1982.[31] According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Pensacola has a humid subtropical climate,[32] (Köppen Cfa), with short, mild winters and hot, humid summers. Typical summer conditions have highs in the lower 90s °F (32–34 °C) and lows in the mid 70s °F (23–24 °C).[33] Afternoon or evening thunderstorms are common during the summer months. Due partly to the coastal location, temperatures above 100 °F (38 °C) are relatively rare, and last occurred in June 2011, when two of the first four days of the month recorded highs reaching the century mark.[34] The highest temperature ever recorded in the city was 106 °F (41 °C) on July 14, 1980.[33] The daily average temperature in January is 51.4 °F (10.8 °C); freezing temperatures occur on an average 13.7 nights per season, with the average window for freezing conditions being from December 13 to February 20.[35] Temperatures below 20 °F (−7 °C) are very rare, and last occurred on January 8, 2015,[36] when a low of 19 °F (−7 °C) was seen.[37] The lowest temperature ever recorded in the city was 5 °F (−15 °C) on January 21, 1985.[33]
During the early years of settlement, a tri-racial creole society developed. As a fortified trading post, the Spanish had mostly men stationed here. Some married or had unions with Pensacola, Creek or African women, both slave and free, and their descendants created a mixed-race population of mestizos and mulattos. The Spanish encouraged slaves from the southern British colonies to come to Florida as a refuge, promising freedom in exchange for conversion to Catholicism. King Charles II of Spain issued a royal proclamation freeing all slaves who fled to Spanish Florida and accepted conversion and baptism. Most went to the area around St. Augustine, but escaped slaves also reached Pensacola. St. Augustine had mustered an all-black militia unit defending Spain as early as 1683.[23]
×