In the midst of downtown’s busy Palafox Street is the 9Blue Morning Gallery 9Blue Morning Gallery Google Map: 21 S. Palafox St. Website: http://bluemorninggallery.com/ 850-429-9100 artist’s cooperative, begun in 1997. It’s so full of artwork that when I first stepped in all I saw was a blur of colors; gradually my eyes adjusted to the large array of jewelry, paintings, blown glass, photography and ceramics on display, created by its more than 60 members. Pensacola offers endless inspiration, jeweler Diane Rennie tells me. “We are this little area of art,” she says. She’s a former president of the cooperative and a longtime member. “It’s such an inspiring environment to be in, and there’s a large retirement community here. People find fun things to do, and one of those things is making art.” David Williams is one of them. A jeweler who specializes in opals, he moved to Pensacola in 2010 after living in Georgia and western North Carolina, and says he’s found his forever home. He lives in a 1920s house near Bayou Texar and kayaks in the bay: “I see dolphins every morning.” 
Pensacola is a great place to live if you love the outdoors. The metro area has many public parks, as well as access to brackish bays and expansive beaches along the Gulf of Mexico – the Gulf Islands National Seashore is especially beautiful. Angling is a popular pastime, and multiple boat ramps provide launching points for deep-sea fishing excursions. Meanwhile, there are plenty of opportunities to enjoy Pensacola's natural surroundings. Project GreenShores – a living shoreline – is an excellent example of ecological restoration and hosts a myriad bird species.

We’re right in the center of everything this beachside town has to offer, within walking distance of the best restaurants and activities. When you stay with us, you’re just minutes away from a fresh fish dinner, parasailing adventure, shopping or spa treatments. We want to help you ‘live like a local,’ with recommendations for whatever suits your vacation or business needs.
In 1559, Don Tristan de Luna y Arellano led the first settlement of the region.[2] His 11 ships, with 1500 settlers,[2] anchored in the bay and established its colony on the site of today's Naval Air Station Pensacola. A hurricane decimated the colony a few weeks later, killing hundreds and sinking 5 ships.[2] Suffering long-term famine and fighting, this first settlement was finally abandoned in 1561.[2] A presidio was constructed on Santa Rosa Island in 1722 near the location of the more recent Fort Pickens. Hurricanes in 1741 and 1752[3] forced its relocation to the mainland.
Birthplace of: Charles H. Percy - Businessman, Michael Hayes (wrestler) - Professional wrestler, Mike McCready - Musician, Roy Jones, Jr. - Rapper, Betty Skelton Erde - Aerobatic pilot, Bill Kurtis - Television producer, Katharine Jefferts Schori - Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church in the of America, Aaron Tippin - Country musician and record producer, Johanna Long - Race car driver, Norvell Austin - Retired professional wrestler.

The resurgence of Pensacola’s downtown in the past few years means several old factories and warehouses near the bay got spruced up and repurposed. One of these was a former box factory, which has been converted into the 14New World Inn. 14New World Inn Google Map: 600 S. Palafox St. Website: https://skopelosatnewworld.com/stay/about-new-world/ 850-432-4111 It also houses Skopelos, a gourmet restaurant. Each room in this upscale hotel is decorated differently and named for a figure from Pensacola’s rich history. The most popular, according to manager Amanda Kirk-Pennington, is the Rachel and Andrew Jackson suite, a favorite of newlyweds, with its California king bed, antique writing desk and separate lounge area. Other rooms — especially those on the second floor — look out onto the waterfront, such as the Vicente Sebastián Pintado, named for a Spanish surveyor who in the early 1800s drew up the plan for Pensacola’s streets. But, um, beware: “We do have a reputation for being haunted,” Kirk-Pennington says. “You’ll hear doors opening or doorknobs that’ll shake. We recently had a guest call down and say things were shaking in his room. But it’s all very benign,” she assures me. “The building is 120 years old, so it stands to reason it would have some quirks.” 

Another great feature of this eco-trail is the fact that there are many regular spots where you’ll find QR codes (quick response codes) - which are designed to be scanned using your smartphone, to access more information about the area. If bird watching, walking trails, biking, hiking, running, swimming, snorkelling, and diving is what you would like to get into for your day - then Pensacola Beach Eco-trail is the one to try out, for sure.
Seafood restaurants crowd the waterfront, but the bustling Joe Patti’s Seafood market stands apart, under a towering neon shrimp sign. Enter by the beignet wagon, and you’ll find an enormous fish market, which is worth a visit just to gape at the sea-dwelling varieties and their sizes. The humble restaurant next door is 8Captain Joey Patti’s Seafood Restaurant. 8Captain Joey Patti's Seafood Restaurant Google Map: 610 S. C St. Website: http://captainjoeysdeli.com/ 850-434-3193 odd hours/days This low-ceilinged blue bunker has no view of the water. It has no atmosphere. Ceiling fans whirl overhead. You eat over paper place mats with plastic utensils. Start with the thick, fiery seafood gumbo but leave room for heaping platters of fried fish. Mullet — you might know it elsewhere as a bait fish — is a rich-flavored specialty. “Did y’all get coleslaw?” our server asks, sliding crisp, sweet bowls of it across the table. Everything here is fresh. Stick a fork in the fried oysters, and juice jumps out; the oysters melt in your mouth. Did the cheese grits descend from heaven? Maybe so; they are that luscious. My physiological limits vexingly got in the way of what I wanted to do here: eat it all and then some.
The location of the property was amazing. Covered parking was available. Even though we were at the front of the villas we were able to walk to the beach every day. We were also close enough to the attractions at Pensacola beach that it was a very short drive. The neighbors in the same condo we were in were very friendly and polite. Brittany the property manager Was very easy to get in touch with and very helpful.
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If you haven’t gotten enough of Pensacola’s sunshine, you’ll find a perfect copy of its blue sky painted on the ceiling of the Spanish Baroque 2Saenger Theatre 2Saenger Theatre Google Map: 118 S. Palafox St. Website: https://www.pensacolasaenger.com/ 850-595-3880 downtown. This jewel of a building, with its soaring white facade and rococo architectural details, opened in 1925 as a vaudeville house and movie theater. The Saenger gradually fell into disrepair and disrepute, known for adult films. “Yes, those kinds of movies,” says Kathy Summerlin, the theater’s director of booking and marketing. After surviving attempts to turn it into a parking garage, it was renovated and is now home to Broadway touring shows; the local symphony, opera and children’s chorus; Ballet Pensacola and a summer movie series. The Saenger’s original pipe organ, with thousands of pipes hidden in the walls, is still played on occasion. Architect Emile Weil possessed a particularly Pensacolan whimsy: Summerlin points out the two plaster soldiers affixed on the walls near the stage, one with a plume on his head, the other with an iguana. One of the plaster ladies is bearded. 
Source: Clifford Grammich, Kirk Hadaway, Richard Houseal, Dale E.Jones, Alexei Krindatch, Richie Stanley and Richard H.Taylor. 2012. 2010 U.S.Religion Census: Religious Congregations & Membership Study. Association of Statisticians of American Religious Bodies. Jones, Dale E., et al. 2002. Congregations and Membership in the United States 2000. Nashville, TN: Glenmary Research Center. Graphs represent county-level data
As was the case in most of Florida, the Democratic primary was the real contest for most state and local elections until the 1970s. However, from the 1960s onward, due in part to the Republican Party's Southern strategy, residents of this staunchly conservative military and Bible Belt city began splitting their tickets and voting Republican in national elections. Despite this, Democrats continued to win most elections at the state and local level well into the 1990s, though most of them were very conservative even by Southern Democratic standards.
A sidewalk aroma tells you all you need to know about the fried-chicken haven that awaits you inside the 75 Sisters Blues Cafe 75 Sisters Blues Cafe Google Map: 421 W. Belmont St. Website: https://fivesistersbluescafe.com/ 850-912-4856 . This stylish restaurant serves up comfort food galore: The black-eyed peas are soft and velvety; the collards have a tart punch; the grits are so creamy they’re like an emotion. Sweet potatoes raise to ambrosial heights, honeyed and warm. Wash them down with the bloody mary of your dreams: garnished with okra and a fried chicken wing. “It’s your fix for the day,” says co-owner Jean-Pierre N’Dione with a laugh. Born in Senegal, raised in France, he’s lived in Pensacola for 20 years. With his cocktails, food, live music on many evenings and a Sunday jazz brunch, he strives to evoke the spirit of the restaurant’s Belmont-DeVilliers neighborhood. Historically, it was an African American hot spot during segregation. “We owe it to those people,” N’Dione says, “to re-create that atmosphere.” 

Pensacola is the home of the Blue Angels, also known as the U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron. For a perfectly symmetrical showcase of stellar airplane acrobatics and aeronautical prowess, the Blue Angels give a show-stopping performance. Colorful streamers, twists, turns and flips through the air are all part and parcel of the air show extravaganza that the Blue Angels have become synonymous with.


Public primary and secondary education schools in Pensacola are administered by the Escambia County School District. The current superintendent of schools for Escambia County is Malcolm Thomas. The University of West Florida, located north of the city, is the largest post-secondary institution in the area. It also has the largest library in the region, the John C. Pace Library.
While generally cooler than most of peninsular Florida, Pensacola Beach maintains a more stable temperature year round than inland areas of Pensacola and Escambia County. As such, winter lows are several degrees warmer than Pensacola proper and summer highs are generally cooler as a result of the surrounding waters. As with many islands, Pensacola Beach enjoys sea breezes which begin around noon and end around sunset in the summer. The average temperature ranges from forty-eight degrees Fahrenheit in January to eighty-nine degrees in July.[5]
Pensacola Beach for many years remained largely undeveloped. The Casino Resort was the first tourist destination constructed on the island (at the present day location of Casino Beach) where a variety of special events including beauty pageants, fishing tournaments and boxing matches were held from the 30s through 50s. With a bar, tennis courts, bath houses, and a restaurant, it was a popular resort until it eventually closed in the 1960s.
Quality Inn & Suites – Situated on Butcherpen Cove in Pensacola Bay, the Quality Inn & Suites is in a great location if your plans take you from the city to the beach. You can walk from your room to the local dive center for a day under the water, or rent a jet-ski for some fun above the surf. Your busy day will be rewarded with a sound night’s sleep in your comfortable guestroom or suite.
While generally cooler than most of peninsular Florida, Pensacola Beach maintains a more stable temperature year round than inland areas of Pensacola and Escambia County. As such, winter lows are several degrees warmer than Pensacola proper and summer highs are generally cooler as a result of the surrounding waters. As with many islands, Pensacola Beach enjoys sea breezes which begin around noon and end around sunset in the summer. The average temperature ranges from forty-eight degrees Fahrenheit in January to eighty-nine degrees in July.[5]
In 1559, Tristán de Luna y Arellano landed with some 1,500 people on 11 ships from Veracruz, Mexico.[18][16][19][20] The expedition was to establish an outpost, ultimately called Santa María de Ochuse by Luna, as a base for Spanish efforts to colonize Santa Elena (present-day Parris Island, South Carolina.) But the colony was decimated by a hurricane on September 19, 1559,[18][16][20] which killed an unknown number of sailors and colonists, sank six ships, grounded a seventh, and ruined supplies.
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