Although the government has changed numerous times throughout Pensacola's history, one thing has remained constant: the region's natural beauty. The beaches facing the Gulf of Mexico are renowned for their white sand and emerald waves. Pensacola provides a gateway to an amazing fishery. Bays are popular with anglers, while offshore fishermen pull up grouper and snapper from the deeper Gulf waters.
* Prices reflect the lowest "base rate" found over the next 30 days. Rates are subject to change and may not include taxes and fees, hotel service charges, extra person charges, or incidentals, such as room service. All rates are displayed in USD unless otherwise noted. Converted rates are provided for your convenience. They are based on today's exchange rate, but the hotel will charge you in the local currency.
Travelers with a taste for luxury and style will feel perfectly at home at the Beach Club Resort Residence and Spa, at 18 Via De Luna, and the Beach Club Condominiums by Wyndham Vacation Rentals, at 731 Pensacola Beach Blvd. If you're hoping to find somewhere that doesn't break the bank, the Days Inn Pensacola Beachfront, 16 Via de Luna, or the Quality Inn & Suites, 51 Gulf Breeze Pkwy, might better serve your needs.
Located on Little Sabine Bay, this Pensacola hotel is located across the street from a private beach and has an outdoor pool. Absolutely loved it! Weekend breakfast was awesome, room was clean, staff was great! They have bicycles, kayaks & paddle boards to use for free! Just make sure you reserve them w/ the front desk! Oh! Got a $10 credit for not using housekeeping! Just make sure you let them know at check out...

In the final stages of the War of 1812, American troops launched an offensive on Pensacola against the Spanish and British garrisons protecting the city, which surrendered after two days of fighting. In 1819, Spain and the United States negotiated the Adams–Onís Treaty, by which Spain sold the Floridas to the United States for US$5 million.[19] A Spanish census of 1820 indicated 181 households in the town, with a third of mixed-blood. The people were predominantly French and Spanish Creole. Indians in the area were noted through records, travelers' accounts, and paintings of the era, including some by George Washington Sully and George Catlin. Creek women were also recorded in marriages to Spanish men, in court records or deeds.[14]
Of all the hotels in Pensacola, FL, on the beach, Days Inn Pensacola Beach will delight you most with spacious guest rooms tastefully decorated in warm, earth tones with light pastel accents. Each room opens to a balcony or deck. Whether you’re here on vacation or business, you’ll enjoy thoughtful amenities that show we understand what you need when you’re away from home.

Another great feature of this eco-trail is the fact that there are many regular spots where you’ll find QR codes (quick response codes) - which are designed to be scanned using your smartphone, to access more information about the area. If bird watching, walking trails, biking, hiking, running, swimming, snorkelling, and diving is what you would like to get into for your day - then Pensacola Beach Eco-trail is the one to try out, for sure.


^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h Jane E. Dysart, "Another Road to Disappearance: Assimilation of Creek Indians in Pensacola, Florida during the Nineteenth Century", The Florida Historical Quarterly, Vol. 61, No. 1 (July 1982), pp. 37–48, Published by: Florida Historical Society, Article Stable URL: https://www.jstor.org/stable/30146156, accessed 26 June 2014
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The original inhabitants of the Pensacola Bay area were Native American peoples. At the time of European contact, a Muskogean-speaking tribe known to the Spanish as the Pensacola lived in the region. This name was not recorded until 1677, but the tribe appears to be the source of the name "Pensacola" for the bay and thence the city.[13] Creek people, also Muskogean-speaking, came regularly from present-day southern Alabama to trade, so the peoples were part of a broader regional and even continental network of relations.[14]
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