It’s Saturday evening in Pensacola, Fla. Past the shops and eateries that line Palafox Street downtown, a wedding reception fills one of several restored historical buildings with light and laughter. Guests spill out onto the sidewalk, while out back couples dance on a terrace overlooking Pensacola Bay. Fireworks burst against the starry sky; they’re set off at the nearby stadium after every home game, win or lose, played by the Blue Wahoos, the city’s minor-league baseball team. There’s a quieter, more romantic vibe as I skirt the wharf and stroll pass the boats. On the deck of one sailboat, lovers slow-dance in the shadows to Ed Sheeran’s “Perfect.”

Retro touches are Pensacola’s leitmotif and nowhere more so than at the 13Solé Inn and Suites 13Solé Inn and Suites Google Map: 200 N. Palafox St. Website: http://soleinnandsuites.com/ 850-470-9298 . This once-ordinary 1958 motel got a vintage facelift, and now its 45 rooms sport modish black-and-white decor, zebra-print pillows and glossy furniture. It’s still a relatively simple place, but the location is perfect for exploring downtown. There’s free breakfast and a happy hour; you can take your wine to the patio and sit by the fountain and contemplate your nightly entertainment choices, which are likely to be only a short walk away.


There is the self-guided tour, where experienced guides will assist you in planning the best routes to take, to explore the historic district at your own leisure. There is also a guided tour, which lasts approximately 1-1.5 hours, and happens from Tuesday to Saturday, from 11.00am to 1.00pm. Themed tours are also available, Tuesday to Saturday, from 2.30pm. Visitors looking to experience this novelty tour are requested to meet at the Tivoli High House at 2.30pm sharp.
During the early years of settlement, a tri-racial creole society developed. As a fortified trading post, the Spanish had mostly men stationed here. Some married or had unions with Pensacola, Creek or African women, both slave and free, and their descendants created a mixed-race population of mestizos and mulattos. The Spanish encouraged slaves from the southern British colonies to come to Florida as a refuge, promising freedom in exchange for conversion to Catholicism. King Charles II of Spain issued a royal proclamation freeing all slaves who fled to Spanish Florida and accepted conversion and baptism. Most went to the area around St. Augustine, but escaped slaves also reached Pensacola. St. Augustine had mustered an all-black militia unit defending Spain as early as 1683.[23]
Utah Vacation RentalsVacation Rentals in Columbia, Maury CountyLake Whatcom Vacation RentalsVacation Rentals close to Sunday River Ski ResortBig Canoe House RentalsCape May Point Vacation RentalsEllensburg Vacation RentalsRocky Mount Vacation Home DestinationsNew Haven Vacation RentalsHome Rentals in GladstoneVacation Rentals in Newport, Penobscot CountyUvalde Vacation RentalsBend Vacation RentalsBrunswick Vacation RentalsEdgartown House RentalsRent at Lake Buena Vista Resort, Orange CountyGlen Arbor Vacation Rentals
* Prices reflect the lowest "base rate" found over the next 30 days. Rates are subject to change and may not include taxes and fees, hotel service charges, extra person charges, or incidentals, such as room service. All rates are displayed in USD unless otherwise noted. Converted rates are provided for your convenience. They are based on today's exchange rate, but the hotel will charge you in the local currency.
In 1821, with Andrew Jackson as provisional governor, Pensacola became part of the United States.[19] The Creek continued to interact with European Americans and African Americans, but the dominant whites increasingly imposed their binary racial classifications: white and black ("colored", within which were included free people of color, including Indians). However, American Indians and mestizos were identified separately in court and Catholic church records, and as Indians in censuses up until 1840, attesting to their presence in the society. After that, the Creek were not separately identified as Indian, but the people did not disappear. Even after removal of many Seminole to Indian Territory, Indians, often of mixed-race but culturally identifying as Muskogean, lived throughout Florida.[14]

City voters approved a charter amendment on June 11, 2013 which eliminated the then-nine member council's two at-large seats; one seat was phased out in November 2014, and the other expired in November 2016. Two additional charter amendments were approved on November 4, 2014 which made the position of mayor subject to recall and provided the city council with the authority to hire staff. The current city hall was opened in 1986.


Bordering Escambia Bay and Pensacola Bay, the Pensacola metro area is a blend of history and nature. Native Americans have lived in this area for millennia, and the Spanish first arrived in the 16th century. Since then, the area has fallen under quite a few jurisdictions. Pensacola has been known as the "City of Five Flags" for the Spanish, French, British, Confederate and American governments that have laid claim to the region, and every year celebrates this diverse history with a 10-day fiesta.
Experience downtown Pensacola, Florida, like you cannot anywhere else. The historic area of Pensacola is specifically designed to preserve and maintain the history of Pensacola, its inhabitants and ancestors. Make the most of exploring this special heritage conservation space by taking part in a Historic Walking Tour. The tours come in various packages:
There are a number of annual festivals, events, historic tours, and landmarks. The Pensacola Seafood Festival and The Pensacola Crawfish Festival held in the heart of historic Downtown has been held for nearly 30 years with live music acts. The Great Gulfcoast Arts Festival is held annually in November in Seville Square often drawing more than 200 regional and international artists as well as The Children's Art Festival which is held in the same park featuring art by children from local area schools. Pensacon is an annual comic convention held each February, that brings in close to 25,000 people from all around the world.

As a community located on a low-lying barrier island, Pensacola Beach is vulnerable to hurricanes. Landfalling storms have been known to drive storm surge over the island, damaging or destroying man made structures and causing beach erosion. In 1995, two hurricanes made landfall on the island. Hurricane Erin made landfall in August while Hurricane Opal blasted the island just two months later, leveling some dunes and destroying a number of homes.


In 1821, with Andrew Jackson as provisional governor, Pensacola became part of the United States.[19] The Creek continued to interact with European Americans and African Americans, but the dominant whites increasingly imposed their binary racial classifications: white and black ("colored", within which were included free people of color, including Indians). However, American Indians and mestizos were identified separately in court and Catholic church records, and as Indians in censuses up until 1840, attesting to their presence in the society. After that, the Creek were not separately identified as Indian, but the people did not disappear. Even after removal of many Seminole to Indian Territory, Indians, often of mixed-race but culturally identifying as Muskogean, lived throughout Florida.[14]
×