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Located on Little Sabine Bay, this Pensacola hotel is located across the street from a private beach and has an outdoor pool. Absolutely loved it! Weekend breakfast was awesome, room was clean, staff was great! They have bicycles, kayaks & paddle boards to use for free! Just make sure you reserve them w/ the front desk! Oh! Got a $10 credit for not using housekeeping! Just make sure you let them know at check out...
Categories: 1698 establishments in the Spanish EmpireCounty seats in FloridaPopulated places on the Intracoastal Waterway in FloridaCities in Escambia County, FloridaPensacola, FloridaFormer colonial and territorial capitals in the United StatesPort cities and towns of the Florida Gulf coastPopulated places established in 1559Cities in FloridaCities in Pensacola metropolitan areaUniversity towns in the United States

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If you're looking for some great Florida beaches but aren't necessarily interested in a mega-resort or theme park atmosphere, Pensacola might just be the place for your perfect weekend. Home to Gulf Islands National Seashore, the city offers some of the best fishing and boating in the area. Inland, canoeing enthusiasts won't want to miss the beauty of the Blackwater River. Closer to town, the city has a proud military heritage, which can be seen at attractions like the National Museum of Naval Aviation and the Pensacola Naval Air Station.

ResortQuest by Wyndham Vacation Rentals is proud to be a Preferred Lodging Sponsor for Emerald Coast Cruizin’. Save up to 20% on lodging when you book with Promo Code CRUIZINFALL. This 3-day classic car show rolls into Panama City Beach, November 7-10. In addition to the chance to show off their classic ride in the official Emerald Coast Cruizin’ parade, registered attendees enjoy access to all the week’s concerts and events. Daily spectator tickets let you see the thousands of show cars and trucks on display, as well as access to the Vendor Market Midway and concerts.
What does your dream beach vacation look like? Relaxing, low-key getaway in a quaint beach bungalow? Sport fishing, parasailing and scuba diving adventure? Luxurious spa treatments, fine dining and shopping? Nature trails, dolphins and shorebirds? Historic downtown, museums and antiquing? Whatever you’re into, the Pensacola Bay Area has just what you’re looking for when it comes to the perfect place to vacation! 
There is one school on Pensacola Beach. The Pensacola Beach Elementary School, within the Escambia County School District (ECSD), is for children from kindergarten through fifth grade. This school has an enrollment ranging from 120 to 140 students. All elementary-school age children on Pensacola Beach are eligible to attend the school. The first year the school was open, for the school year 1977–1978, classes were held in an empty A-frame house. The Pensacola Beach Volunteer Fire Department building was also used in aiding the teachers and administrators. In November 1977, four portable buildings were moved to the present site. They school has received the 5 Star School award since 1998.[citation needed] In 2001 the Pensacola Beach Elementary lost its direct district operational control and became a charter school.[15] In September 2004 Hurricane Ivan destroyed an office and four classrooms. Jeff Castleberry, the principal, argued that ECSD would have closed the school if it had direct operational control. The costs to fix the damage at Pensacola Beach Elementary was $1.5 million. The campus is adjacent to the Gulf of Mexico and is built on stilt. In 2016 Thomas St. Myer of the Pensacola News Journal described it as one of several Escambia County charter schools that "exemplify charter schools at their finest".[16]
British military resources were limited and Pensacola ranked fairly low on their list of priorities. For this reason only small token amounts of British military forces were ever sent to defend Pensacola. This was in contrast to colonies such as South Carolina, where large numbers of British soldiers were sent.[26] After Spain joined the American Revolution in 1779 on the side of the rebels, Spanish forces captured the city in the 1781 Battle of Pensacola, gaining control of West Florida.[19] After the war, the British officially ceded both West Florida and East Florida to Spain as part of the post-war peace settlement.
The petite, charming Quina House, built in 1820 or earlier, is the oldest house in Pensacola that’s still in its original location, now the heart of the 16Historic District 16Historic District Google Map: 204 S. Alcaniz St. Website: https://pensacolahistoricpreservationsociety.com/quinahouse 850-432-3050 . “It has 1820s air conditioning,” says Ed Muller, docent for the house, “a front door, back door and 12-foot ceilings.” Muller is a treasure trove of history; he will tell you how the Spanish landed in what is now Pensacola Bay six years before they established St. Augustine, on Florida’s Atlantic coast, which lays claim to being the nation’s oldest — but not first — city. That colony was the first to survive beyond a few weeks — in fact, it lasted about two years. Soon after the colonists arrived, a hurricane sank most of their ships and wiped out their provisions, including livestock. (Muller says it’s his belief that most of the settlers died because they didn’t eat oysters.) Eventually even the survivors who had hung on to the shrinking settlement vacated. Over the centuries, the French and Spanish tussled over the region. You can pick up some of those influences in the cottages of this pleasant district. Muller lives two blocks from the Quina House; he moved to Pensacola from New Jersey and says he’ll never leave. “Everyone comes to visit me,” he says, “and I don’t have to go anywhere for vacation.”
Generations of families have been coming to our beach to reconnect and have fun.  With downtown Pensacola so close, business travelers and groups like to stay at the Beach even when conducting business “in town.” Everyone enjoys the white sand beach and emerald waters of the Gulf. Everyone also gets to enjoy the flyovers by the world renowned Blue Angels, based right here in Pensacola. The presence of our Navy also provides the memorable opportunity to visit the Naval Air Museum.
Most residents choose to navigate the metro area by car. A number of major thoroughfares traverse the region: Interstate 110 runs north to south, connecting central Pensacola with Interstate 10, which moves east to west across Florida. Meanwhile, Routes 29, 90 and 98 link the downtown area with nearby communities like Ensley, Myrtle Grove and Bellview. Those who don't have a car can rely on the Escambia County Area Transit, or ECAT, system, which operates bus and trolley routes throughout the greater Pensacola area. However, access to the transit system becomes less extensive the farther you are from central Pensacola.
As of the census[7] of 2010, there were 51,923 people, 23,600 households, and 14,665 families residing in the city, and 402,000 people in the Pensacola MSA. The population density was 2,303.5 people per square mile (956.8/km²). There were 26,848 housing units at an average density of 1,189.4 per square mile (459.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city is 66.3% White, 28.0% African American, 2.0% Asian, 0.6% Native American, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 2.3% from two or more races. 3.3% are Hispanic or Latino of any race.

If you're looking for some great Florida beaches but aren't necessarily interested in a mega-resort or theme park atmosphere, Pensacola might just be the place for your perfect weekend. Home to Gulf Islands National Seashore, the city offers some of the best fishing and boating in the area. Inland, canoeing enthusiasts won't want to miss the beauty of the Blackwater River. Closer to town, the city has a proud military heritage, which can be seen at attractions like the National Museum of Naval Aviation and the Pensacola Naval Air Station.
I’m driving on Via De Luna through Pensacola Beach, and I’ve soon left the condos behind. The name changes to Fort Pickens Road, running through unspoiled dunes and leading me into 3Gulf Islands National Seashore. 3Gulf Islands National Seashore Google Map: Fort Pickens Road Website: https://www.nps.gov/guis/planyourvisit/florida.htm 850-934-2600 Pensacola Beach is actually part of a barrier island across Pensacola Bay from the city of Pensacola. The west end of that barrier island is in this protected park, bordered by spotless white sand and bunchy green knobs of sandhill rosemary. Beyond, on either side of me, there’s all that clear, sparkling water. Suddenly I’m in my bathing suit, standing shin-deep in the gulf, watching little fish dart around my toes. A few sandpipers pick their way to the water’s edge, and together we study the marine life beneath the waves. It doesn’t occur to me to do anything else. Later, I remember my mission and drive to the island’s tip to tour Fort Pickens, construction of which ended in 1834. It was, in its era, a war machine, with more than 200 cannons as well as tunnels filled with gunpowder. You can catch a ferryboat from here; just last summer, a ferry system started shuttling passengers from Pensacola to Pensacola Beach and Fort Pickens.
Categories: 1698 establishments in the Spanish EmpireCounty seats in FloridaPopulated places on the Intracoastal Waterway in FloridaCities in Escambia County, FloridaPensacola, FloridaFormer colonial and territorial capitals in the United StatesPort cities and towns of the Florida Gulf coastPopulated places established in 1559Cities in FloridaCities in Pensacola metropolitan areaUniversity towns in the United States
ResortQuest by Wyndham Vacation Rentals is proud to be a Preferred Lodging Sponsor for Emerald Coast Cruizin’. Save up to 20% on lodging when you book with Promo Code CRUIZINFALL. This 3-day classic car show rolls into Panama City Beach, November 7-10. In addition to the chance to show off their classic ride in the official Emerald Coast Cruizin’ parade, registered attendees enjoy access to all the week’s concerts and events. Daily spectator tickets let you see the thousands of show cars and trucks on display, as well as access to the Vendor Market Midway and concerts.

There were 24,524 households out of which 24.6% had children living with them, 39.7% were married couples living together, 16.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.2% were non-families. 32.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.27 and the average family size was 2.92.


Another great feature of this eco-trail is the fact that there are many regular spots where you’ll find QR codes (quick response codes) - which are designed to be scanned using your smartphone, to access more information about the area. If bird watching, walking trails, biking, hiking, running, swimming, snorkelling, and diving is what you would like to get into for your day - then Pensacola Beach Eco-trail is the one to try out, for sure.
Hotels: Ashton Inn & Suites (910 North Navy Boulevard) (1), Bayou Grande Efficiency Apartments (1801 Heinrich Street Apt 11) (2), Best Western Perdido Key Beach (13585 Perdido Key Drive) (3), Budget Inn (1700 West Cervantes Street) (4), Best Western Pensacola (8240 North Davis Highway) (5), Bay Breeze Restaurant at Ramada Inn (7601 Scenic Highway) (6), American Inn (6400 Mobile Highway) (7), Circle Motel (4222 Mobile Highway) (8), Capital Circle Hotel Company (2601 Wilde Lake Boulevard) (9). Display/hide their approximate locations on the map
Pensacola Beach is an unincorporated community located on Santa Rosa Island, a barrier island, in Escambia County, Florida, United States. It is situated south of Pensacola (and Gulf Breeze connected via bridges spanning to the Fairpoint Peninsula and then to the island) in the Gulf of Mexico. As of the 2000 census, the community had a total population of 2,738. Pensacola Beach occupies land bound by a 1947 deed from the United States Department of Interior that it be administered in the public interest by the county or leased, but never "disposed"; its businesses and residents are thus long-term leaseholders and not property owners.[1]

The survivors struggled to survive, most moving inland to what is now central Alabama for several months in 1560 before returning to the coast; but in 1561, the effort was abandoned.[18][20] Some of the survivors eventually sailed to Santa Elena, but another storm struck there. Survivors made their way to Cuba and finally returned to Pensacola, where the remaining fifty at Pensacola were taken back to Veracruz. The Viceroy's advisers later concluded that northwest Florida was too dangerous to settle. They ignored it for 137 years.[18][20]
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